Effects of supercritical carbon dioxide treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation in soy sauce and hot-pepper paste marinated pork

Young Min Choi, Sang Hoon Lee, Jee Hwan Choe, Kyoung Heon Kim, Min-Suk Rhee, Byoung-Chul Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation of marinated pork. Meat marinated in two traditional Korean marinades, soy sauce and hot-pepper paste, and raw marinated meat were then treated with 7.4, 12.2, or 15.2 MPa CO2 at 31.1°C for 10 min. The SC-CO2 treatments had no effect on the meat pH (p>0.05) or Warner-Bratzler shear force (p>0.05). There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the total loss (sum of treatment loss and cooking loss) between the control and SC-CO2 treated samples at 15.2 MPa (soy sauce marinated pork: 21.78 vs. 18.97%; hot-pepper marinated pork: 21.61 vs. 18.01%). After the SC-CO2 treatment, lighter surface colors were observed in the treatment samples compared to those of the control samples (p< 0.001). However, tasting panelists were unable to distinguish a difference in color or in overall acceptability of the control and treatment (p>0.05). In the case of soy sauce marinated pork, when SC-CO2 applied at 15.2 MPa and 31.1°C for 10 min, treatment samples showed a tenderer meat than the control samples. Therefore, the SC-CO2 treatment conditions had no adverse effects on the sensory quality characteristics of the marinated meat products.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)581-586
Number of pages6
JournalKorean Journal for Food Science of Animal Resources
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Soy Foods
soy sauce
Capsicum
hot peppers
Ointments
Carbon Dioxide
Meat
meat quality
pork
sensory evaluation
carbon dioxide
meat
Meat Products
Cooking
sampling
marinating
Color
raw meat
Red Meat
cooking quality

Keywords

  • Marinated pork
  • Meat quality
  • Sensory evaluation
  • Supercritical carbon dioxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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title = "Effects of supercritical carbon dioxide treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation in soy sauce and hot-pepper paste marinated pork",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation of marinated pork. Meat marinated in two traditional Korean marinades, soy sauce and hot-pepper paste, and raw marinated meat were then treated with 7.4, 12.2, or 15.2 MPa CO2 at 31.1°C for 10 min. The SC-CO2 treatments had no effect on the meat pH (p>0.05) or Warner-Bratzler shear force (p>0.05). There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the total loss (sum of treatment loss and cooking loss) between the control and SC-CO2 treated samples at 15.2 MPa (soy sauce marinated pork: 21.78 vs. 18.97{\%}; hot-pepper marinated pork: 21.61 vs. 18.01{\%}). After the SC-CO2 treatment, lighter surface colors were observed in the treatment samples compared to those of the control samples (p< 0.001). However, tasting panelists were unable to distinguish a difference in color or in overall acceptability of the control and treatment (p>0.05). In the case of soy sauce marinated pork, when SC-CO2 applied at 15.2 MPa and 31.1°C for 10 min, treatment samples showed a tenderer meat than the control samples. Therefore, the SC-CO2 treatment conditions had no adverse effects on the sensory quality characteristics of the marinated meat products.",
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AU - Rhee, Min-Suk

AU - Kim, Byoung-Chul

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N2 - The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation of marinated pork. Meat marinated in two traditional Korean marinades, soy sauce and hot-pepper paste, and raw marinated meat were then treated with 7.4, 12.2, or 15.2 MPa CO2 at 31.1°C for 10 min. The SC-CO2 treatments had no effect on the meat pH (p>0.05) or Warner-Bratzler shear force (p>0.05). There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the total loss (sum of treatment loss and cooking loss) between the control and SC-CO2 treated samples at 15.2 MPa (soy sauce marinated pork: 21.78 vs. 18.97%; hot-pepper marinated pork: 21.61 vs. 18.01%). After the SC-CO2 treatment, lighter surface colors were observed in the treatment samples compared to those of the control samples (p< 0.001). However, tasting panelists were unable to distinguish a difference in color or in overall acceptability of the control and treatment (p>0.05). In the case of soy sauce marinated pork, when SC-CO2 applied at 15.2 MPa and 31.1°C for 10 min, treatment samples showed a tenderer meat than the control samples. Therefore, the SC-CO2 treatment conditions had no adverse effects on the sensory quality characteristics of the marinated meat products.

AB - The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) treatment on meat quality and sensory evaluation of marinated pork. Meat marinated in two traditional Korean marinades, soy sauce and hot-pepper paste, and raw marinated meat were then treated with 7.4, 12.2, or 15.2 MPa CO2 at 31.1°C for 10 min. The SC-CO2 treatments had no effect on the meat pH (p>0.05) or Warner-Bratzler shear force (p>0.05). There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the total loss (sum of treatment loss and cooking loss) between the control and SC-CO2 treated samples at 15.2 MPa (soy sauce marinated pork: 21.78 vs. 18.97%; hot-pepper marinated pork: 21.61 vs. 18.01%). After the SC-CO2 treatment, lighter surface colors were observed in the treatment samples compared to those of the control samples (p< 0.001). However, tasting panelists were unable to distinguish a difference in color or in overall acceptability of the control and treatment (p>0.05). In the case of soy sauce marinated pork, when SC-CO2 applied at 15.2 MPa and 31.1°C for 10 min, treatment samples showed a tenderer meat than the control samples. Therefore, the SC-CO2 treatment conditions had no adverse effects on the sensory quality characteristics of the marinated meat products.

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