Effects of temperature and partial pressure of CO2/O2 on corrosion behaviour of stainless-steel in molten Li/Na carbonate salt

Tae Hoon Lim, Eung Rim Hwang, Heung Yong Ha, SukWoo Nam, In Hwan Oh, Seong Ahn Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The corrosion tests with AISI-type 316L and 310S stainless steels are carried out to understand the abnormal corrosion behaviour observed in a molten 52 m/o Li2CO3-48 m/o Na2CO3 salt in the temperature range of 520 °C to 580 °C, particularly in the presence of CO2 and O2. Two experimental methods, namely, an out-of-cell test and an electrochemical method, were employed to analyze the corrosion behaviour with varying gas composition as well as temperature. The samples tested in the temperature range of 520 °C to 580 °C suffer more corrosion attack than those tested in the temperature range of 600 °C to 650 °C. Optical microscope analysis of samples from out-of-cell tests for 100 h show that the surfaces of the samples, regardless of the type of stainless-steel, were corroded severely by pitting when the temperature is below 580 °C. Samples tested above 600 °C, however, do not suffer significant corrosion attack. This is also confirmed by potentiodynamic results. The polarization curves of 316L stainless-steel samples measured above 600 °C exhibit the typical active-passive behaviour, but the passive region disappears when the temperature is below 580 °C. This is attributed to the formation of a porous LiFe5O8 passive film. By contrast, the formation of a LiFeO2 passive film, dense enough to provide protection, is observed with increasing temperature over 600 °C. It is also found that the partial pressure of CO2 affects markedly the corrosion rate, but the partial pressure of O2 does not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Power Sources
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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Carbonates
Stainless Steel
Partial pressure
partial pressure
Molten materials
stainless steels
carbonates
corrosion
Stainless steel
Salts
Corrosion
salts
Temperature
attack
temperature
corrosion tests
pitting
gas composition
gas temperature
optical microscopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrochemistry
  • Fuel Technology
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Effects of temperature and partial pressure of CO2/O2 on corrosion behaviour of stainless-steel in molten Li/Na carbonate salt. / Lim, Tae Hoon; Hwang, Eung Rim; Ha, Heung Yong; Nam, SukWoo; Oh, In Hwan; Hong, Seong Ahn.

In: Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 89, No. 1, 01.07.2000, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Tae Hoon ; Hwang, Eung Rim ; Ha, Heung Yong ; Nam, SukWoo ; Oh, In Hwan ; Hong, Seong Ahn. / Effects of temperature and partial pressure of CO2/O2 on corrosion behaviour of stainless-steel in molten Li/Na carbonate salt. In: Journal of Power Sources. 2000 ; Vol. 89, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
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