Effects of thermal sensitivity of fish proteins from various species on rheological properties of gels

O. Esturk, Jae W. Park, S. Thawornchinsombut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermal sensitivity of myofibrillar proteins from various fish species were compared at various pre-incubation (setting) treatments and chopping temperatures. There was a significant species effect on gel texture by both pre-incubation and chopping temperatures. Whereas Alaska pollock had the highest shear stress values at 5°C or lower temperatures, big eye, lizardfish, and threadfin bream had higher fracture shear stress values at 25°C or higher temperatures. Decreased intensity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) for warm-water species set at 40 °C clearly revealed higher thermal stability of these particular species.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume69
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fish Proteins
rheological properties
Hot Temperature
Gels
gels
heat
chopping
Temperature
fish
shear stress
temperature
proteins
Synodontidae
Polynemidae
Stress Fractures
Theragra chalcogramma
myofibrillar proteins
Myosin Heavy Chains
myosin heavy chains
bream

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Effects of thermal sensitivity of fish proteins from various species on rheological properties of gels. / Esturk, O.; Park, Jae W.; Thawornchinsombut, S.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 69, No. 8, 01.10.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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