Efficacy of continuous epidural infusion with epidural electric stimulation compared to that of conventional continuous epidural infusion for acute herpes zoster management: A retrospective study

Chung Hun Lee, Sang Sik Choi, Mi Kyoung Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: Continuous epidural infusions are commonly used in clinical settings to reduce the likelihood of transition to postherpetic neuralgia via pain control. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of conventional continuous epidural infusion to that of continuous epidural infusion in which the catheter is guided by electric stimulation to areas with neurological damage for the treatment of zoster-related pain and prevention of postherpetic neuralgia. Methods: We analyzed the medical records of 114 patients in this study. The patients were divided into two groups: Contrast (conventional continuous epidural infusion) and stimulation (continuous epidural infusion with epidural electric stimulation). In the contrast group, the position of the epidural catheter was confirmed using contrast medium alone, whereas in the stimulation group, the site of herpes zoster infection was identified through electric stimulation using a guidewire in the catheter. Clinical efficacy was assessed using a numerical rating scale (pain score) up to 6 months after the procedures. We compared the percentage of patients who showed complete remission (pain score less than 2 and no further medication) in each group. We also investigated whether the patients required additional interventional treatment due to insufficient pain control during the 6-month follow-up period after each procedure. Results: After adjusting for confounding variables, the pain score was significantly lower in the stimulation group than in the contrast group for 6 months after the procedure. After adjustment, the odds of complete remission were 1.9-times higher in the stimulation group than in the contrast group (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-4.44, P = 0.14). Patients in the contrast group were significantly more likely to require other interventions within 6 months of the procedure than patients in the stimulation group (odds ratio: 3.62, 95% CI: 1.17-11.19, P = 0.03). Conclusion: Epidural drug administration to specific spinal segments using electric stimulation catheters may be more helpful than conventional continuous epidural infusion for improving pain and preventing postherpetic neuralgia in the acute phase of herpes zoster.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number26
    JournalBMC Anesthesiology
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jan 28

    Keywords

    • Continuous epidural infusion
    • Electric stimulation
    • Epidural analgesia
    • Herpes zoster
    • Postherpetic neuralgia

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Efficacy of continuous epidural infusion with epidural electric stimulation compared to that of conventional continuous epidural infusion for acute herpes zoster management: A retrospective study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this