Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker for Inner Ear Pathology Following Lateral Wall and Peri-modiolar Cochlear Implantation

Chanan Shaul, Christofer W. Bester, Stefan Weder, June Choi, Hayden Eastwood, K. V. Padmavathi, Aaron Collins, Stephen J. O'Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Spikes in cochlear implant impedance are associated with inner ear pathology after implantation. Here, we correlate these spikes with episodes of hearing loss and/or vertigo, with a comparison between lateral wall and peri-modiolar electrode arrays. METHODS: Seven hundred seventy recipients of Cochlear's slim-straight, lateral wall electrode (CI422), or peri-modiolar (CI512) electrode were investigated for impedance spikes. Impedance fluctuations were defined as a median rise of ≥ 4 kΩ across all intracochlear electrodes from baseline measurements taken 2 weeks after switch-on. Medical records were analyzed from 189 of the 770 patients. RESULTS: The slim straight, lateral wall electrode was found to spike in impedance at a significantly higher rate than the peri-modiolar array (17% vs 12%). The peri-modiolar electrode tended to spike in impedance earlier than the slim-straight electrode. Impedance spikes were found to significantly correlate with medical events (hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus). Overall, in the "spike" group, 42 of 75 patients (56%) demonstrated a clinical event during the impedance spike, whereas 26 of 114 patients (22%) of the "non-spike" group had a clinical event. This significant difference existed with both implant types. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a small, but significant increase in impedance spikes in lateral wall electrodes, and support the relationship between spikes in cochlear implant impedances and postoperative inner-ear events, including the loss of residual hearing and vertigo. Monitoring cochlear implant impedance may be a method for early detection, and so the prevention, of these events in the future.

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implantation
Inner Ear
Electric Impedance
Biomarkers
Pathology
Electrodes
Cochlear Implants
Vertigo
Hearing Loss
Tinnitus
Cochlea
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker for Inner Ear Pathology Following Lateral Wall and Peri-modiolar Cochlear Implantation. / Shaul, Chanan; Bester, Christofer W.; Weder, Stefan; Choi, June; Eastwood, Hayden; Padmavathi, K. V.; Collins, Aaron; O'Leary, Stephen J.

In: Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.06.2019, p. e518-e526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d8db0e1832eb4ff789f6c306caa3b351,
title = "Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker for Inner Ear Pathology Following Lateral Wall and Peri-modiolar Cochlear Implantation",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Spikes in cochlear implant impedance are associated with inner ear pathology after implantation. Here, we correlate these spikes with episodes of hearing loss and/or vertigo, with a comparison between lateral wall and peri-modiolar electrode arrays. METHODS: Seven hundred seventy recipients of Cochlear's slim-straight, lateral wall electrode (CI422), or peri-modiolar (CI512) electrode were investigated for impedance spikes. Impedance fluctuations were defined as a median rise of ≥ 4 kΩ across all intracochlear electrodes from baseline measurements taken 2 weeks after switch-on. Medical records were analyzed from 189 of the 770 patients. RESULTS: The slim straight, lateral wall electrode was found to spike in impedance at a significantly higher rate than the peri-modiolar array (17{\%} vs 12{\%}). The peri-modiolar electrode tended to spike in impedance earlier than the slim-straight electrode. Impedance spikes were found to significantly correlate with medical events (hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus). Overall, in the {"}spike{"} group, 42 of 75 patients (56{\%}) demonstrated a clinical event during the impedance spike, whereas 26 of 114 patients (22{\%}) of the {"}non-spike{"} group had a clinical event. This significant difference existed with both implant types. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a small, but significant increase in impedance spikes in lateral wall electrodes, and support the relationship between spikes in cochlear implant impedances and postoperative inner-ear events, including the loss of residual hearing and vertigo. Monitoring cochlear implant impedance may be a method for early detection, and so the prevention, of these events in the future.",
author = "Chanan Shaul and Bester, {Christofer W.} and Stefan Weder and June Choi and Hayden Eastwood and Padmavathi, {K. V.} and Aaron Collins and O'Leary, {Stephen J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/MAO.0000000000002227",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "e518--e526",
journal = "Otology and Neurotology",
issn = "1531-7129",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker for Inner Ear Pathology Following Lateral Wall and Peri-modiolar Cochlear Implantation

AU - Shaul, Chanan

AU - Bester, Christofer W.

AU - Weder, Stefan

AU - Choi, June

AU - Eastwood, Hayden

AU - Padmavathi, K. V.

AU - Collins, Aaron

AU - O'Leary, Stephen J.

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Spikes in cochlear implant impedance are associated with inner ear pathology after implantation. Here, we correlate these spikes with episodes of hearing loss and/or vertigo, with a comparison between lateral wall and peri-modiolar electrode arrays. METHODS: Seven hundred seventy recipients of Cochlear's slim-straight, lateral wall electrode (CI422), or peri-modiolar (CI512) electrode were investigated for impedance spikes. Impedance fluctuations were defined as a median rise of ≥ 4 kΩ across all intracochlear electrodes from baseline measurements taken 2 weeks after switch-on. Medical records were analyzed from 189 of the 770 patients. RESULTS: The slim straight, lateral wall electrode was found to spike in impedance at a significantly higher rate than the peri-modiolar array (17% vs 12%). The peri-modiolar electrode tended to spike in impedance earlier than the slim-straight electrode. Impedance spikes were found to significantly correlate with medical events (hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus). Overall, in the "spike" group, 42 of 75 patients (56%) demonstrated a clinical event during the impedance spike, whereas 26 of 114 patients (22%) of the "non-spike" group had a clinical event. This significant difference existed with both implant types. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a small, but significant increase in impedance spikes in lateral wall electrodes, and support the relationship between spikes in cochlear implant impedances and postoperative inner-ear events, including the loss of residual hearing and vertigo. Monitoring cochlear implant impedance may be a method for early detection, and so the prevention, of these events in the future.

AB - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Spikes in cochlear implant impedance are associated with inner ear pathology after implantation. Here, we correlate these spikes with episodes of hearing loss and/or vertigo, with a comparison between lateral wall and peri-modiolar electrode arrays. METHODS: Seven hundred seventy recipients of Cochlear's slim-straight, lateral wall electrode (CI422), or peri-modiolar (CI512) electrode were investigated for impedance spikes. Impedance fluctuations were defined as a median rise of ≥ 4 kΩ across all intracochlear electrodes from baseline measurements taken 2 weeks after switch-on. Medical records were analyzed from 189 of the 770 patients. RESULTS: The slim straight, lateral wall electrode was found to spike in impedance at a significantly higher rate than the peri-modiolar array (17% vs 12%). The peri-modiolar electrode tended to spike in impedance earlier than the slim-straight electrode. Impedance spikes were found to significantly correlate with medical events (hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus). Overall, in the "spike" group, 42 of 75 patients (56%) demonstrated a clinical event during the impedance spike, whereas 26 of 114 patients (22%) of the "non-spike" group had a clinical event. This significant difference existed with both implant types. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a small, but significant increase in impedance spikes in lateral wall electrodes, and support the relationship between spikes in cochlear implant impedances and postoperative inner-ear events, including the loss of residual hearing and vertigo. Monitoring cochlear implant impedance may be a method for early detection, and so the prevention, of these events in the future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066061718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066061718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002227

DO - 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002227

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - e518-e526

JO - Otology and Neurotology

JF - Otology and Neurotology

SN - 1531-7129

IS - 5

ER -