Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization

Joel K. Wise, Michael Cho, Eyal Zussman, Constantine M. Megaridis, Alexander Yarin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrils in most natural tissues are not random, but exhibit well-defined patterns and specific spatial orientation. Recent findings demonstrated that oriented biopolymer-based nanofibrous scaffolds have the potential for engineering blood vessels [1], neural tissue [2], and ligament tissue [3]. Furthermore, it has been shown that cell adhesion and proliferation [1] is significantly improved on oriented nanofibrous scaffolds. The contact guidance theory suggests that cells have the greatest probability of migrating in preferred orientations which are associated with chemical, structural, and=or mechanical properties of the substrate [4-6]. Consequently, it may be postulated that an oriented nanofibrous scaffold would guide cell alignment along the nanofibers. The cell arrangement onto an oriented nanofibrous scaffold could be due to the contact guidance and=or to cytoskeletal reorganization. Aligned cells could then be used to remodel and modulate the regenerated ECM and microenvironment [7].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanotechnology and Tissue Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationThe Scaffold
PublisherCRC Press
Pages243-260
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781420051834
ISBN (Print)9781420051827
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electrospinning
Scaffolds
Tissue
Extracellular Matrix
Biopolymers
Ligaments
Cell adhesion
Blood vessels
Cell proliferation
Nanofibers
Cell Adhesion
Blood Vessels
Mechanical properties
Cell Proliferation
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Wise, J. K., Cho, M., Zussman, E., Megaridis, C. M., & Yarin, A. (2008). Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization. In Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold (pp. 243-260). CRC Press.

Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization. / Wise, Joel K.; Cho, Michael; Zussman, Eyal; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Yarin, Alexander.

Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold. CRC Press, 2008. p. 243-260.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wise, JK, Cho, M, Zussman, E, Megaridis, CM & Yarin, A 2008, Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization. in Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold. CRC Press, pp. 243-260.
Wise JK, Cho M, Zussman E, Megaridis CM, Yarin A. Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization. In Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold. CRC Press. 2008. p. 243-260
Wise, Joel K. ; Cho, Michael ; Zussman, Eyal ; Megaridis, Constantine M. ; Yarin, Alexander. / Electrospinning techniques to control deposition and structural alignment of nanofibrous scaffolds for cellular orientation and cytoskeletal reorganization. Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold. CRC Press, 2008. pp. 243-260
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