Elevated free fatty acid is associated with cardioembolic stroke subtype

Woo Keun Seo, Juyeon Kim, Yoo Kim, Ji Kim, Kyungmi Oh, Seong Beom Koh, Hong Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Free fatty acids (FFAs), an important energy substrate, have an association with cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, myocardial dysfunction and abnormal cardiac rhythm. However, limited reports are available on the association between FFAs and ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that plasma FFA concentration could be associated with an ischemic stroke, emphasizing the relationship between FFA and subtypes of ischemic stroke. Methods: A cross-sectional study examined the association between FFA concentration and subtypes of stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis from a hospital-based acute stroke registry. Results: Data of 715 stroke patients were analyzed. The concentration of FFA was highest in the cardioembolic stroke subtype compared with the other stroke subtypes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an increase in FFA concentration was significantly associated with the cardioembolic subtype after the adjustment of covariates. FFA concentration was also higher in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) than those without AF. According to the presence of atherosclerotic stenosis, no significantly difference of FFA concentration was found for intracranial and extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Here we report a significant association between fasting FFA concentration and the cardioembolic stroke subtype. AF is suggested as the mediating factor between FFA and the cardioembolic stroke subtype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)874-879
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal of Neurological Sciences
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov 1

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Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Stroke
Intracranial Arteriosclerosis
Atrial Fibrillation
Social Adjustment
Registries
Fasting
Atherosclerosis
Pathologic Constriction
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Elevated free fatty acid is associated with cardioembolic stroke subtype. / Seo, Woo Keun; Kim, Juyeon; Kim, Yoo; Kim, Ji; Oh, Kyungmi; Koh, Seong Beom; Seo, Hong.

In: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.11.2011, p. 874-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seo, Woo Keun ; Kim, Juyeon ; Kim, Yoo ; Kim, Ji ; Oh, Kyungmi ; Koh, Seong Beom ; Seo, Hong. / Elevated free fatty acid is associated with cardioembolic stroke subtype. In: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 874-879.
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