Elevated preprocedural high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis development after successful coronary artery stenting

Joon Hong Young, Ho Jeong Myung, Sang Yeob Lim, Rok Lee Sang, Hun Kim Kye, Suk Sohn Il, Wook Park Hyung, Han Kim Ju, Weon Kim, Youngkeun Ahn, Gwan Cho Jeong, Chun Park Jong, Chaee Kang Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent data indicate that an elevated serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts the risk of recurrent coronary events, and that statin therapy decreases the risk of coronary events. This study assessed the relationship between the pre-procedural hs-CRP level and in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) after stenting and the effects of statins on the relationship between restenosis after stenting and the serum hs-CRP levels of patients with coronary artery disease. Methods and Results: This study included 100 patients who underwent stent implantation for angiographically significant stenosis. Patients were divided into a normal C-reactive protein (CRP) group (<0.5 mg/dl, n=59) and elevated CRP group (≥0.5 mg/dl, n=41). All patients underwent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound follow-up at 6 months. The baseline CRP level was 0.29±0.08 mg/dl in the normal CRP group and 2.90±2.31 mg/dl in the elevated CRP group. The NIH cross-sectional area (CSA) in the minimal lumen CSA at follow-up was significantly larger in the elevated CRP group compared with the normal CRP group (1.9±1.3mm 2 vs 3.0±1.5mm 2, p=0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between pre-interventional CRP level and NIH area (r=0.52, p<0.001). In patients with normal CRP, an association between statin therapy and restenosis was not observed. However, when the analysis was confined to patients with elevated CRP, statin therapy significantly reduced the restenosis rate (20% vs 37.5%, p=0.031). In the normal CRP group, the intra-stent neointimal area at 6 months was not different between the non-statin and statin groups (2.2±1.4mm 2 vs 1.8±1.1mm 2). However, in the elevated CRP group, statin therapy significantly decreased the neointimal area at 6-month follow-up (3.6± 1.7mm 2 vs 2.4±1.3mm 2, p<0.001). Conclusion: Measuring the pre-interventional hs-CRP level may help predict the development of restenosis after stenting and statin therapy will significantly reduce the restenosis rate in patients with an elevated hs-CRP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1477-1483
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume69
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

C-Reactive Protein
Hyperplasia
Coronary Vessels
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Stents
Therapeutics
Group Psychotherapy
Serum
Coronary Artery Disease
Pathologic Constriction

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Restenosis
  • Stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Elevated preprocedural high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis development after successful coronary artery stenting. / Young, Joon Hong; Myung, Ho Jeong; Lim, Sang Yeob; Sang, Rok Lee; Kye, Hun Kim; Il, Suk Sohn; Hyung, Wook Park; Ju, Han Kim; Kim, Weon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Gwan Cho; Jong, Chun Park; Jung, Chaee Kang.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 69, No. 12, 01.12.2005, p. 1477-1483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, Joon Hong ; Myung, Ho Jeong ; Lim, Sang Yeob ; Sang, Rok Lee ; Kye, Hun Kim ; Il, Suk Sohn ; Hyung, Wook Park ; Ju, Han Kim ; Kim, Weon ; Ahn, Youngkeun ; Jeong, Gwan Cho ; Jong, Chun Park ; Jung, Chaee Kang. / Elevated preprocedural high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis development after successful coronary artery stenting. In: Circulation Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 69, No. 12. pp. 1477-1483.
@article{95c2eba896294af99eb1ba5f2552d3a7,
title = "Elevated preprocedural high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis development after successful coronary artery stenting",
abstract = "Background: Recent data indicate that an elevated serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts the risk of recurrent coronary events, and that statin therapy decreases the risk of coronary events. This study assessed the relationship between the pre-procedural hs-CRP level and in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) after stenting and the effects of statins on the relationship between restenosis after stenting and the serum hs-CRP levels of patients with coronary artery disease. Methods and Results: This study included 100 patients who underwent stent implantation for angiographically significant stenosis. Patients were divided into a normal C-reactive protein (CRP) group (<0.5 mg/dl, n=59) and elevated CRP group (≥0.5 mg/dl, n=41). All patients underwent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound follow-up at 6 months. The baseline CRP level was 0.29±0.08 mg/dl in the normal CRP group and 2.90±2.31 mg/dl in the elevated CRP group. The NIH cross-sectional area (CSA) in the minimal lumen CSA at follow-up was significantly larger in the elevated CRP group compared with the normal CRP group (1.9±1.3mm 2 vs 3.0±1.5mm 2, p=0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between pre-interventional CRP level and NIH area (r=0.52, p<0.001). In patients with normal CRP, an association between statin therapy and restenosis was not observed. However, when the analysis was confined to patients with elevated CRP, statin therapy significantly reduced the restenosis rate (20{\%} vs 37.5{\%}, p=0.031). In the normal CRP group, the intra-stent neointimal area at 6 months was not different between the non-statin and statin groups (2.2±1.4mm 2 vs 1.8±1.1mm 2). However, in the elevated CRP group, statin therapy significantly decreased the neointimal area at 6-month follow-up (3.6± 1.7mm 2 vs 2.4±1.3mm 2, p<0.001). Conclusion: Measuring the pre-interventional hs-CRP level may help predict the development of restenosis after stenting and statin therapy will significantly reduce the restenosis rate in patients with an elevated hs-CRP.",
keywords = "Inflammation, Restenosis, Stent",
author = "Young, {Joon Hong} and Myung, {Ho Jeong} and Lim, {Sang Yeob} and Sang, {Rok Lee} and Kye, {Hun Kim} and Il, {Suk Sohn} and Hyung, {Wook Park} and Ju, {Han Kim} and Weon Kim and Youngkeun Ahn and Jeong, {Gwan Cho} and Jong, {Chun Park} and Jung, {Chaee Kang}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1253/circj.69.1477",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "1477--1483",
journal = "Circulation Journal",
issn = "1346-9843",
publisher = "Japanese Circulation Society",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elevated preprocedural high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis development after successful coronary artery stenting

AU - Young, Joon Hong

AU - Myung, Ho Jeong

AU - Lim, Sang Yeob

AU - Sang, Rok Lee

AU - Kye, Hun Kim

AU - Il, Suk Sohn

AU - Hyung, Wook Park

AU - Ju, Han Kim

AU - Kim, Weon

AU - Ahn, Youngkeun

AU - Jeong, Gwan Cho

AU - Jong, Chun Park

AU - Jung, Chaee Kang

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Background: Recent data indicate that an elevated serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts the risk of recurrent coronary events, and that statin therapy decreases the risk of coronary events. This study assessed the relationship between the pre-procedural hs-CRP level and in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) after stenting and the effects of statins on the relationship between restenosis after stenting and the serum hs-CRP levels of patients with coronary artery disease. Methods and Results: This study included 100 patients who underwent stent implantation for angiographically significant stenosis. Patients were divided into a normal C-reactive protein (CRP) group (<0.5 mg/dl, n=59) and elevated CRP group (≥0.5 mg/dl, n=41). All patients underwent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound follow-up at 6 months. The baseline CRP level was 0.29±0.08 mg/dl in the normal CRP group and 2.90±2.31 mg/dl in the elevated CRP group. The NIH cross-sectional area (CSA) in the minimal lumen CSA at follow-up was significantly larger in the elevated CRP group compared with the normal CRP group (1.9±1.3mm 2 vs 3.0±1.5mm 2, p=0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between pre-interventional CRP level and NIH area (r=0.52, p<0.001). In patients with normal CRP, an association between statin therapy and restenosis was not observed. However, when the analysis was confined to patients with elevated CRP, statin therapy significantly reduced the restenosis rate (20% vs 37.5%, p=0.031). In the normal CRP group, the intra-stent neointimal area at 6 months was not different between the non-statin and statin groups (2.2±1.4mm 2 vs 1.8±1.1mm 2). However, in the elevated CRP group, statin therapy significantly decreased the neointimal area at 6-month follow-up (3.6± 1.7mm 2 vs 2.4±1.3mm 2, p<0.001). Conclusion: Measuring the pre-interventional hs-CRP level may help predict the development of restenosis after stenting and statin therapy will significantly reduce the restenosis rate in patients with an elevated hs-CRP.

AB - Background: Recent data indicate that an elevated serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts the risk of recurrent coronary events, and that statin therapy decreases the risk of coronary events. This study assessed the relationship between the pre-procedural hs-CRP level and in-stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) after stenting and the effects of statins on the relationship between restenosis after stenting and the serum hs-CRP levels of patients with coronary artery disease. Methods and Results: This study included 100 patients who underwent stent implantation for angiographically significant stenosis. Patients were divided into a normal C-reactive protein (CRP) group (<0.5 mg/dl, n=59) and elevated CRP group (≥0.5 mg/dl, n=41). All patients underwent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound follow-up at 6 months. The baseline CRP level was 0.29±0.08 mg/dl in the normal CRP group and 2.90±2.31 mg/dl in the elevated CRP group. The NIH cross-sectional area (CSA) in the minimal lumen CSA at follow-up was significantly larger in the elevated CRP group compared with the normal CRP group (1.9±1.3mm 2 vs 3.0±1.5mm 2, p=0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between pre-interventional CRP level and NIH area (r=0.52, p<0.001). In patients with normal CRP, an association between statin therapy and restenosis was not observed. However, when the analysis was confined to patients with elevated CRP, statin therapy significantly reduced the restenosis rate (20% vs 37.5%, p=0.031). In the normal CRP group, the intra-stent neointimal area at 6 months was not different between the non-statin and statin groups (2.2±1.4mm 2 vs 1.8±1.1mm 2). However, in the elevated CRP group, statin therapy significantly decreased the neointimal area at 6-month follow-up (3.6± 1.7mm 2 vs 2.4±1.3mm 2, p<0.001). Conclusion: Measuring the pre-interventional hs-CRP level may help predict the development of restenosis after stenting and statin therapy will significantly reduce the restenosis rate in patients with an elevated hs-CRP.

KW - Inflammation

KW - Restenosis

KW - Stent

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28544435747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28544435747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1253/circj.69.1477

DO - 10.1253/circj.69.1477

M3 - Article

VL - 69

SP - 1477

EP - 1483

JO - Circulation Journal

JF - Circulation Journal

SN - 1346-9843

IS - 12

ER -