Elevated pressure, a novel cancer therapeutic tool for sensitizing cisplatin-mediated apoptosis in A549

Sangnam Oh, Yanghee Kim, Joonhee Kim, Daeho Kwon, Eun Il Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intensive cancer therapy strategies have thus far focused on sensitizing cancer cells to anticancer drug-mediated apoptosis to overcome drug resistance, and this strategy has led to more effective cancer therapeutics. Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), CDDP) is an effective anticancer drug used to treat many types of cancer, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and can be used in combination with various chemicals to enhance cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we introduce the use of elevated pressure (EP) in combination with CDDP for cancer treatment and explore the effects of EP on CDDP-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells. Our findings demonstrate that preconditioning NSCLC cells with EP sensitizes cells for CDDP-induced apoptosis. Enhanced apoptosis was dependent on p53 and HO-1 expression, and was associated with increased DNA damage and down-regulation of genes involved in nucleotide excision repair. The transcriptional levels of transporter proteins indicated that the mechanism by which EP-induced CDDP sensitization was intracellular drug accumulation. The protein levels of some antioxidants, such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), were decreased in A549 cells exposed to EP via the down-regulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2). Furthermore, normal human fibroblasts were resistant to EP treatment, with no elevated DNA damage or apoptosis. Collectively, these data show that administration of EP is a potential adjuvant tool for CDDP-based chemosensitivity of lung cancer cells that may reduce drug resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-97
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume399
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Cisplatin
Apoptosis
Pressure
Cells
Neoplasms
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Heme Oxygenase-1
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Resistance
Therapeutics
DNA Damage
NF-E2 Transcription Factor
Down-Regulation
Oncology
DNA
Fibroblasts
Glutathione Peroxidase
DNA Repair
Glutathione
Lung Neoplasms

Keywords

  • CDDP
  • Drug resistance
  • Elevated pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Elevated pressure, a novel cancer therapeutic tool for sensitizing cisplatin-mediated apoptosis in A549. / Oh, Sangnam; Kim, Yanghee; Kim, Joonhee; Kwon, Daeho; Lee, Eun Il.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 399, No. 1, 01.08.2010, p. 91-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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