Enhanced transfection rates of small-interfering RNA using dioleylglutamide-based magnetic lipoplexes

Soondong Lee, Gayong Shim, Sunil Kim, Young Bong Kim, Chan Wha Kim, Youngro Byun, Yu Kyoung Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetic force-guided delivery (magnetofection) has been studied as a new modality for introducing small-interfering RNA (siRNA) into target cells, but its delivery efficiency needs to be improved. Here, we report that magnetofection of N,N′′-dioleylglutamide (DG)-based magnetic lipoplexes can substantially enhance the cellular delivery rates of siRNA. The siRNA was triply complexed with DG-based cationic liposomes and cationic iron-oxide nanoparticles. The formation of siRNA-containing magnetic lipoplexes was confirmed by gel retardation, sizes, and zeta potential values. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of fluorescent marker-labeled siRNA revealed that the DG-based magnetic lipoplexes conferred a higher cellular delivery rate of siRNA than DG-based lipoplexes or Lipofectamine 2000. In addition to the enhanced delivery of siRNA, the DG-based magnetic lipoplexes showed lack of cytotoxicity. We then tested the application of these magnetic lipoplexes for the cellular delivery of anticancer siRNA. Cancer cell lines magnetofected with DG-based magnetic lipoplexes containing Mcl1-specific siRNA (siMcl1) showed much lower viability than the groups treated with DG-based lipoplexes or Lipofectamine 2000, indicating that our magnetofection strategy conferred greater siMcl1-induced anticancer activity. These results suggest that DG-based magnetic lipoplexes are promising candidates for enhancing the efficiency of magnetic field-guided siRNA delivery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-172
Number of pages8
JournalNucleic Acid Therapeutics
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jun 1

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Small Interfering RNA
Transfection
Flow cytometry
Fluorescence microscopy
Zeta potential
Magnetic Fields
Cytotoxicity
Fluorescence Microscopy
Liposomes
Nanoparticles
Flow Cytometry
Gels
Cells
Magnetic fields
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biochemistry
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Enhanced transfection rates of small-interfering RNA using dioleylglutamide-based magnetic lipoplexes. / Lee, Soondong; Shim, Gayong; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Young Bong; Kim, Chan Wha; Byun, Youngro; Oh, Yu Kyoung.

In: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.06.2011, p. 165-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Soondong ; Shim, Gayong ; Kim, Sunil ; Kim, Young Bong ; Kim, Chan Wha ; Byun, Youngro ; Oh, Yu Kyoung. / Enhanced transfection rates of small-interfering RNA using dioleylglutamide-based magnetic lipoplexes. In: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 165-172.
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