Evaluation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products with emphasis on anthelmintics in human sanitary waste, sewage, hospital wastewater, livestock wastewater and receiving water

Won Jin Sim, Hee Young Kim, Sung Deuk Choi, Jung-Hwan Kwon, Jeong Eun Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated 33 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) with emphasis on anthelmintics and their metabolites in human sanitary waste treatment plants (HTPs), sewage treatment plants (STPs), hospital wastewater treatment plants (HWTPs), livestock wastewater treatment plants (LWTPs), river water and seawater. PPCPs showed the characteristic specific occurrence patterns according to wastewater sources. The LWTPs and HTPs showed higher levels (maximum 3000 times in influents) of anthelmintics than other wastewater treatment plants, indicating that livestock wastewater and human sanitary waste are one of principal sources of anthelmintics. Among anthelmintics, fenbendazole and its metabolites are relatively high in the LWTPs, while human anthelmintics such as albendazole and flubendazole are most dominant in the HTPs, STPs and HWTPs. The occurrence pattern of fenbendazole's metabolites in water was different from pharmacokinetics studies, showing the possibility of transformation mechanism other than the metabolism in animal bodies by some processes unknown to us. The river water and seawater are generally affected by the point sources, but the distribution patterns in some receiving water are slightly different from the effluent, indicating the influence of non-point sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume248-249
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 5

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Services
Anthelmintics
Livestock
Sewage
Waste Water
Wastewater treatment
Drug products
Agriculture
livestock
Wastewater
sewage
wastewater
Waste treatment
Water
Metabolites
Fenbendazole
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Sewage treatment plants
metabolite
Seawater

Keywords

  • Anthelmintics
  • Human sanitary waste
  • Pharmaceuticals and personal care products
  • Receiving water
  • Wastewater

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Evaluation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products with emphasis on anthelmintics in human sanitary waste, sewage, hospital wastewater, livestock wastewater and receiving water. / Sim, Won Jin; Kim, Hee Young; Choi, Sung Deuk; Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Oh, Jeong Eun.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 248-249, No. 1, 05.03.2013, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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