Evaluation of the time-resolved nanoparticle emissions and the vehicle performance characteristics for a turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam gasoline particulate filter

Sungha Baek, Dongyoung Jin, Wonwook Jang, Cha Lee Myung, Simsoo Park, Jeongmin Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nanoparticle emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines are of concern because of the high particle number concentrations compared with those from a gasoline port fuel injection engine. A gasoline particulate filter is a potential solution for reducing the particulate matter emissions. In this study, a 2.0 l turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam-type gasoline particulate filter was tested using the New European Driving Cycle and steady vehicle operating conditions. The particle number concentration, the particle-size distribution and the filtration efficiency were determined using a condensation particle counter and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500). The particle number emissions (particle numbers per vehicle travelling distance (particles/km)) over the New European Driving Cycle were 1.95 × 1012 particles/km for a base vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter and 5.68 × 1011 particles/km for the additional installation of a gasoline particulate filter on the base gasoline direct-injection vehicle. The filtration efficiency of the particle number and the particulate matter mass reached approximately 71% and 67% respectively. The nucleation-mode particles in the size range less than 23 nm for the gasoline direct-injection vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter were further reduced on installation of a gasoline particulate filter at the downstream position of the three-way catalytic converter. A sharp pressure drop between the gasoline particulate filter of 21.0 mbar was obtained at a vehicle speed of 120 km/h in the New European Driving Cycle. The exhaust gas temperature before the gasoline particulate filter reached around 380-610 °C at steady vehicle speeds of 60-120 km/h. The installation of the gasoline particulate filter has the potential to satisfy the Euro 6c particle number emissions regulations for light-duty gasoline direct-injection vehicles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)745-753
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering
Volume230
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Vehicle performance
Direct injection
Gasoline
Foams
Nanoparticles
Metals
Catalytic converters
Engines
Radiation counters
Fuel injection
Exhaust gases
Particle size analysis
Particles (particulate matter)
Pressure drop
Spectrometers
Condensation
Nucleation

Keywords

  • gasoline direct injection
  • Gasoline particulate filter
  • particle number
  • particulate matter
  • sub-23 nm particle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Evaluation of the time-resolved nanoparticle emissions and the vehicle performance characteristics for a turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam gasoline particulate filter",
abstract = "The nanoparticle emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines are of concern because of the high particle number concentrations compared with those from a gasoline port fuel injection engine. A gasoline particulate filter is a potential solution for reducing the particulate matter emissions. In this study, a 2.0 l turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam-type gasoline particulate filter was tested using the New European Driving Cycle and steady vehicle operating conditions. The particle number concentration, the particle-size distribution and the filtration efficiency were determined using a condensation particle counter and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500). The particle number emissions (particle numbers per vehicle travelling distance (particles/km)) over the New European Driving Cycle were 1.95 × 1012 particles/km for a base vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter and 5.68 × 1011 particles/km for the additional installation of a gasoline particulate filter on the base gasoline direct-injection vehicle. The filtration efficiency of the particle number and the particulate matter mass reached approximately 71{\%} and 67{\%} respectively. The nucleation-mode particles in the size range less than 23 nm for the gasoline direct-injection vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter were further reduced on installation of a gasoline particulate filter at the downstream position of the three-way catalytic converter. A sharp pressure drop between the gasoline particulate filter of 21.0 mbar was obtained at a vehicle speed of 120 km/h in the New European Driving Cycle. The exhaust gas temperature before the gasoline particulate filter reached around 380-610 °C at steady vehicle speeds of 60-120 km/h. The installation of the gasoline particulate filter has the potential to satisfy the Euro 6c particle number emissions regulations for light-duty gasoline direct-injection vehicles.",
keywords = "gasoline direct injection, Gasoline particulate filter, particle number, particulate matter, sub-23 nm particle",
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AU - Jin, Dongyoung

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AU - Myung, Cha Lee

AU - Park, Simsoo

AU - Lee, Jeongmin

PY - 2015

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N2 - The nanoparticle emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines are of concern because of the high particle number concentrations compared with those from a gasoline port fuel injection engine. A gasoline particulate filter is a potential solution for reducing the particulate matter emissions. In this study, a 2.0 l turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam-type gasoline particulate filter was tested using the New European Driving Cycle and steady vehicle operating conditions. The particle number concentration, the particle-size distribution and the filtration efficiency were determined using a condensation particle counter and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500). The particle number emissions (particle numbers per vehicle travelling distance (particles/km)) over the New European Driving Cycle were 1.95 × 1012 particles/km for a base vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter and 5.68 × 1011 particles/km for the additional installation of a gasoline particulate filter on the base gasoline direct-injection vehicle. The filtration efficiency of the particle number and the particulate matter mass reached approximately 71% and 67% respectively. The nucleation-mode particles in the size range less than 23 nm for the gasoline direct-injection vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter were further reduced on installation of a gasoline particulate filter at the downstream position of the three-way catalytic converter. A sharp pressure drop between the gasoline particulate filter of 21.0 mbar was obtained at a vehicle speed of 120 km/h in the New European Driving Cycle. The exhaust gas temperature before the gasoline particulate filter reached around 380-610 °C at steady vehicle speeds of 60-120 km/h. The installation of the gasoline particulate filter has the potential to satisfy the Euro 6c particle number emissions regulations for light-duty gasoline direct-injection vehicles.

AB - The nanoparticle emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines are of concern because of the high particle number concentrations compared with those from a gasoline port fuel injection engine. A gasoline particulate filter is a potential solution for reducing the particulate matter emissions. In this study, a 2.0 l turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam-type gasoline particulate filter was tested using the New European Driving Cycle and steady vehicle operating conditions. The particle number concentration, the particle-size distribution and the filtration efficiency were determined using a condensation particle counter and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500). The particle number emissions (particle numbers per vehicle travelling distance (particles/km)) over the New European Driving Cycle were 1.95 × 1012 particles/km for a base vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter and 5.68 × 1011 particles/km for the additional installation of a gasoline particulate filter on the base gasoline direct-injection vehicle. The filtration efficiency of the particle number and the particulate matter mass reached approximately 71% and 67% respectively. The nucleation-mode particles in the size range less than 23 nm for the gasoline direct-injection vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter were further reduced on installation of a gasoline particulate filter at the downstream position of the three-way catalytic converter. A sharp pressure drop between the gasoline particulate filter of 21.0 mbar was obtained at a vehicle speed of 120 km/h in the New European Driving Cycle. The exhaust gas temperature before the gasoline particulate filter reached around 380-610 °C at steady vehicle speeds of 60-120 km/h. The installation of the gasoline particulate filter has the potential to satisfy the Euro 6c particle number emissions regulations for light-duty gasoline direct-injection vehicles.

KW - gasoline direct injection

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KW - particulate matter

KW - sub-23 nm particle

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