Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome

B. S. Goldman, W. C. Nierman, D. Kaiser, S. C. Slater, A. S. Durkin, J. Eisen, C. M. Ronning, W. B. Barbazuk, M. Blanchard, C. Field, C. Halling, G. Hinkle, O. Iartchuk, Heenam Kim, C. Mackenzie, R. Madupu, N. Miller, A. Shvartsbeyn, S. A. Sullivan, M. Vaudin & 2 others R. Wiegand, H. B. Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

285 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myxobacteria are single-celled, but social, eubacterial predators. Upon starvation they build multicellular fruiting bodies using a developmental program that progressively changes the pattern of cell movement and the repertoire of genes expressed. Development terminates with spore differentiation and is coordinated by both diffusible and cell-bound signals. The growth and development of Myxococcus xanthus is regulated by the integration of multiple signals from outside the cells with physiological signals from within. A collection of M. xanthus cells behaves, in many respects, like a multicellular organism. For these reasons M. xanthus offers unparalleled access to a regulatory network that controls development and that organizes cell movement on surfaces. The genome of M. xanthus is large (9.14 Mb), considerably larger than the other sequenced δ-proteobacteria. We suggest that gene duplication and divergence were major contributors to genomic expansion from its progenitor. More than 1,500 duplications specific to the myxobacterial lineage were identified, representing >15% of the total genes. Genes were not duplicated at random; rather, genes for cell-cell signaling, small molecule sensing, and integrative transcription control were amplified selectively. Families of genes encoding the production of secondary metabolites are overrepresented in the genome but may have been received by horizontal gene transfer and are likely to be important for predation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15200-15205
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume103
Issue number41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Oct 10
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myxococcus xanthus
Genome
Genes
Cell Movement
Myxococcales
Proteobacteria
Horizontal Gene Transfer
Gene Duplication
Starvation
Spores
Growth and Development

Keywords

  • Evolution of signaling
  • Genome expansion
  • Multicellular development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Goldman, B. S., Nierman, W. C., Kaiser, D., Slater, S. C., Durkin, A. S., Eisen, J., ... Kaplan, H. B. (2006). Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(41), 15200-15205. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0607335103

Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome. / Goldman, B. S.; Nierman, W. C.; Kaiser, D.; Slater, S. C.; Durkin, A. S.; Eisen, J.; Ronning, C. M.; Barbazuk, W. B.; Blanchard, M.; Field, C.; Halling, C.; Hinkle, G.; Iartchuk, O.; Kim, Heenam; Mackenzie, C.; Madupu, R.; Miller, N.; Shvartsbeyn, A.; Sullivan, S. A.; Vaudin, M.; Wiegand, R.; Kaplan, H. B.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 103, No. 41, 10.10.2006, p. 15200-15205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldman, BS, Nierman, WC, Kaiser, D, Slater, SC, Durkin, AS, Eisen, J, Ronning, CM, Barbazuk, WB, Blanchard, M, Field, C, Halling, C, Hinkle, G, Iartchuk, O, Kim, H, Mackenzie, C, Madupu, R, Miller, N, Shvartsbeyn, A, Sullivan, SA, Vaudin, M, Wiegand, R & Kaplan, HB 2006, 'Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 103, no. 41, pp. 15200-15205. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0607335103
Goldman, B. S. ; Nierman, W. C. ; Kaiser, D. ; Slater, S. C. ; Durkin, A. S. ; Eisen, J. ; Ronning, C. M. ; Barbazuk, W. B. ; Blanchard, M. ; Field, C. ; Halling, C. ; Hinkle, G. ; Iartchuk, O. ; Kim, Heenam ; Mackenzie, C. ; Madupu, R. ; Miller, N. ; Shvartsbeyn, A. ; Sullivan, S. A. ; Vaudin, M. ; Wiegand, R. ; Kaplan, H. B. / Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2006 ; Vol. 103, No. 41. pp. 15200-15205.
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