Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

“Turbidity” caused by multiple light scattering distorts the propagation of waves and thus undermines optical imaging. For example, translucent biological tissues exhibiting optical turbidity have posed limitations on the imaging depth and energy transmission. However, recent advances in wavefront-sensing and wavefront-shaping technologies have opened the door to imaging and controlling wave propagation through a complex scattering medium. In this chapter, a novel method called turbid lens imaging (TLI) is introduced that records a transmission matrix (TM) of a scattering medium characterizing the input-output response of the medium. The knowledge of this TM allows one to find an incident wave out of the distorted transmitted wave. Therefore, it converts the highly complex medium into a useful imaging optics. By the use of the TM, the image distortion by a scattering medium can be eliminated and a clean object image can be retrieved as a result. The TLI was also adapted for imaging through a multimode optical fiber, which is a scattering medium, for the endomicroscopic imaging. In addition to imaging, the knowledge of TM was used to enhance light energy delivery through a highly scattering medium. This seemingly implausible task was made possible by coupling light into the resonance modes, called transmission eigenchannels, of the medium. With all these studies, the TLI will lead to great important applications in deep-tissue optical bio-imaging and disease treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages271-301
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9789400750524
ISBN (Print)9789400750517
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Lenses
Optical Imaging
Imaging techniques
Light
Optical Fibers
Scattering
scattering
turbidity
lenses
matrices
Technology
Turbidity
Wavefronts
Tissue
Multimode fibers
wave propagation
delivery
Multiple scattering
light scattering
optical fibers

Keywords

  • Endomicroscopy
  • Interferometric microscope
  • Scattering medium
  • Transmission eigenchannel
  • Transmission matrix
  • Turbid lens imaging
  • Turbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Choi, Y., Kim, M., & Choi, W. (2017). Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications. In Handbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering (pp. 271-301). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5052-4_28

Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications. / Choi, Youngwoon; Kim, Moonseok; Choi, Wonshik.

Handbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering. Springer Netherlands, 2017. p. 271-301.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Choi, Y, Kim, M & Choi, W 2017, Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications. in Handbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering. Springer Netherlands, pp. 271-301. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5052-4_28
Choi Y, Kim M, Choi W. Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications. In Handbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering. Springer Netherlands. 2017. p. 271-301 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5052-4_28
Choi, Youngwoon ; Kim, Moonseok ; Choi, Wonshik. / Exploiting complex media for biomedical applications. Handbook of Photonics for Biomedical Engineering. Springer Netherlands, 2017. pp. 271-301
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