Exploring the differences between adolescents' and parents' ratings on adolescents' smartphone addiction

Hyun Chul Youn, Soyoung Irene Lee, So Hee Lee, Ji Youn Kim, Ji Hoon Kim, Eun Jin Park, June Sung Park, Soo Young Bhang, Moon-Soo Lee, Yeon Jung Lee, Sang Cheol Choi, Tae Young Choi, A. Reum Lee, Dae Jin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Smartphone addiction has recently been highlighted as a major health issue among adolescents. In this study, we assessed the degree of agreement between adolescents' and parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction. Additionally, we evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with adolescents' and parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction. Methods:In total, 158 adolescents aged 12-19 years and their parents participated in this study. The adolescents completed the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) and the Isolated Peer Relationship Inventory (IPRI). Their parents also completed the SAS (about their adolescents), SAS-Short Version (SAS-SV; about themselves), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). We used the paired t-test, McNemar test, and Pearson's correlation analyses. Results:Percentage of risk users was higher in parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction than ratings of adolescents themselves. There was disagreement between the SAS and SAS-parent report total scores and subscale scores on positive anticipation, withdrawal, and cyberspace-oriented relationship. SAS scores were positively associated with average minutes of weekday/holiday smartphone use and scores on the IPRI and father's GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scores. Additionally, SAS-parent report scores showed positive associations with average minutes of weekday/holiday smartphone use and each parent's SAS-SV, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores. Conclusion:The results suggest that clinicians need to consider both adolescents' and parents' reports when assessing adolescents' smartphone addiction, and be aware of the possibility of under- or overestimation. Our results cannot only be a reference in assessing adolescents' smartphone addiction, but also provide inspiration for future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere347
JournalJournal of Korean medical science
Volume33
Issue number52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 24

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Parents
Anxiety Disorders
Smartphone
Holidays
Health
Equipment and Supplies
Fathers
Psychology

Keywords

  • Addictive behavior
  • Adolescent
  • Depression
  • Parents
  • Smartphone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Exploring the differences between adolescents' and parents' ratings on adolescents' smartphone addiction. / Youn, Hyun Chul; Lee, Soyoung Irene; Lee, So Hee; Kim, Ji Youn; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Eun Jin; Park, June Sung; Bhang, Soo Young; Lee, Moon-Soo; Lee, Yeon Jung; Choi, Sang Cheol; Choi, Tae Young; Lee, A. Reum; Kim, Dae Jin.

In: Journal of Korean medical science, Vol. 33, No. 52, e347, 24.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Youn, HC, Lee, SI, Lee, SH, Kim, JY, Kim, JH, Park, EJ, Park, JS, Bhang, SY, Lee, M-S, Lee, YJ, Choi, SC, Choi, TY, Lee, AR & Kim, DJ 2018, 'Exploring the differences between adolescents' and parents' ratings on adolescents' smartphone addiction', Journal of Korean medical science, vol. 33, no. 52, e347. https://doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e347
Youn, Hyun Chul ; Lee, Soyoung Irene ; Lee, So Hee ; Kim, Ji Youn ; Kim, Ji Hoon ; Park, Eun Jin ; Park, June Sung ; Bhang, Soo Young ; Lee, Moon-Soo ; Lee, Yeon Jung ; Choi, Sang Cheol ; Choi, Tae Young ; Lee, A. Reum ; Kim, Dae Jin. / Exploring the differences between adolescents' and parents' ratings on adolescents' smartphone addiction. In: Journal of Korean medical science. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 52.
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AU - Lee, Soyoung Irene

AU - Lee, So Hee

AU - Kim, Ji Youn

AU - Kim, Ji Hoon

AU - Park, Eun Jin

AU - Park, June Sung

AU - Bhang, Soo Young

AU - Lee, Moon-Soo

AU - Lee, Yeon Jung

AU - Choi, Sang Cheol

AU - Choi, Tae Young

AU - Lee, A. Reum

AU - Kim, Dae Jin

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AB - Background:Smartphone addiction has recently been highlighted as a major health issue among adolescents. In this study, we assessed the degree of agreement between adolescents' and parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction. Additionally, we evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with adolescents' and parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction. Methods:In total, 158 adolescents aged 12-19 years and their parents participated in this study. The adolescents completed the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) and the Isolated Peer Relationship Inventory (IPRI). Their parents also completed the SAS (about their adolescents), SAS-Short Version (SAS-SV; about themselves), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). We used the paired t-test, McNemar test, and Pearson's correlation analyses. Results:Percentage of risk users was higher in parents' ratings of adolescents' smartphone addiction than ratings of adolescents themselves. There was disagreement between the SAS and SAS-parent report total scores and subscale scores on positive anticipation, withdrawal, and cyberspace-oriented relationship. SAS scores were positively associated with average minutes of weekday/holiday smartphone use and scores on the IPRI and father's GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scores. Additionally, SAS-parent report scores showed positive associations with average minutes of weekday/holiday smartphone use and each parent's SAS-SV, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores. Conclusion:The results suggest that clinicians need to consider both adolescents' and parents' reports when assessing adolescents' smartphone addiction, and be aware of the possibility of under- or overestimation. Our results cannot only be a reference in assessing adolescents' smartphone addiction, but also provide inspiration for future studies.

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KW - Adolescent

KW - Depression

KW - Parents

KW - Smartphone

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