Expression of p53 protein in rheumatoid arthritis synovium. An immunohistochemical analysis.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Mutation of p53 may play a role in manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium, but several studies on p53 expression in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. We investigated the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells in rheumatoid arthritis synovium, in comparison with osteoarthritis synovium, by using immunohistochemistry with two other monoclonal antibodies for p53. METHODS: Synovial tissues from 9 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 5 patients with osteoarthritis were examined for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry with 2 monoclonal antibodies for p53, DO-1 and DO-7. Histologic features of inflammation were also scored and compared with p53 expression. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between inflammatory scores in both groups. In the synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis patients, p53 positive cells were detected in 3 out of 9 samples(33%) and p53 expressions were restricted to inflammatory mononuclear cells, but synovial lining cells, subsynovial fibroblast-like cells and vascular endothelial cells were p53 negative. p53 expressions in osteoarthritis synovial tissues as control were observed in 2 out of 5 samples(40%) and the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells were comparable to those seen in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues. There was no demonstrable correlation between the synovial tissues of both groups with respect to inflammation scores and expression of p53 protein. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that altered p53 expression may not play a significant role in the manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium. However these data need to be strengthened by increasing the number of samples and molecular biology approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalThe Korean journal of internal medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jan 1

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Synovial Membrane
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Proteins
Immunohistochemistry
Monoclonal Antibodies
Inflammation
Molecular Biology
Endothelial Cells
Fibroblasts
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Expression of p53 protein in rheumatoid arthritis synovium. An immunohistochemical analysis.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Mutation of p53 may play a role in manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium, but several studies on p53 expression in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. We investigated the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells in rheumatoid arthritis synovium, in comparison with osteoarthritis synovium, by using immunohistochemistry with two other monoclonal antibodies for p53. METHODS: Synovial tissues from 9 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 5 patients with osteoarthritis were examined for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry with 2 monoclonal antibodies for p53, DO-1 and DO-7. Histologic features of inflammation were also scored and compared with p53 expression. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between inflammatory scores in both groups. In the synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis patients, p53 positive cells were detected in 3 out of 9 samples(33{\%}) and p53 expressions were restricted to inflammatory mononuclear cells, but synovial lining cells, subsynovial fibroblast-like cells and vascular endothelial cells were p53 negative. p53 expressions in osteoarthritis synovial tissues as control were observed in 2 out of 5 samples(40{\%}) and the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells were comparable to those seen in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues. There was no demonstrable correlation between the synovial tissues of both groups with respect to inflammation scores and expression of p53 protein. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that altered p53 expression may not play a significant role in the manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium. However these data need to be strengthened by increasing the number of samples and molecular biology approaches.",
author = "Lee, {Young Ho} and Ji, {Jong Dae} and Aeree Kim and Kim, {Chul Hwan} and Song, {Gwan Gyu}",
year = "1999",
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T1 - Expression of p53 protein in rheumatoid arthritis synovium. An immunohistochemical analysis.

AU - Lee, Young Ho

AU - Ji, Jong Dae

AU - Kim, Aeree

AU - Kim, Chul Hwan

AU - Song, Gwan Gyu

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Mutation of p53 may play a role in manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium, but several studies on p53 expression in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. We investigated the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells in rheumatoid arthritis synovium, in comparison with osteoarthritis synovium, by using immunohistochemistry with two other monoclonal antibodies for p53. METHODS: Synovial tissues from 9 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 5 patients with osteoarthritis were examined for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry with 2 monoclonal antibodies for p53, DO-1 and DO-7. Histologic features of inflammation were also scored and compared with p53 expression. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between inflammatory scores in both groups. In the synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis patients, p53 positive cells were detected in 3 out of 9 samples(33%) and p53 expressions were restricted to inflammatory mononuclear cells, but synovial lining cells, subsynovial fibroblast-like cells and vascular endothelial cells were p53 negative. p53 expressions in osteoarthritis synovial tissues as control were observed in 2 out of 5 samples(40%) and the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells were comparable to those seen in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues. There was no demonstrable correlation between the synovial tissues of both groups with respect to inflammation scores and expression of p53 protein. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that altered p53 expression may not play a significant role in the manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium. However these data need to be strengthened by increasing the number of samples and molecular biology approaches.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Mutation of p53 may play a role in manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium, but several studies on p53 expression in synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. We investigated the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells in rheumatoid arthritis synovium, in comparison with osteoarthritis synovium, by using immunohistochemistry with two other monoclonal antibodies for p53. METHODS: Synovial tissues from 9 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 5 patients with osteoarthritis were examined for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry with 2 monoclonal antibodies for p53, DO-1 and DO-7. Histologic features of inflammation were also scored and compared with p53 expression. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between inflammatory scores in both groups. In the synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis patients, p53 positive cells were detected in 3 out of 9 samples(33%) and p53 expressions were restricted to inflammatory mononuclear cells, but synovial lining cells, subsynovial fibroblast-like cells and vascular endothelial cells were p53 negative. p53 expressions in osteoarthritis synovial tissues as control were observed in 2 out of 5 samples(40%) and the amount and pattern of p53 positive cells were comparable to those seen in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues. There was no demonstrable correlation between the synovial tissues of both groups with respect to inflammation scores and expression of p53 protein. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that altered p53 expression may not play a significant role in the manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis synovium. However these data need to be strengthened by increasing the number of samples and molecular biology approaches.

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