Fabrication of nano-electrode arrays of free-standing carbon nanotubes on nano-patterned substrate by imprint method

W. S. Chang, J. W. Kim, D. G. Choi, Chang-Soo Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The synthesis of isolated carbon nanotubes with uniform outer diameters and ordered spacing over wafer-scale areas was investigated for fabrication of nano-electrode arrays on silicon wafers for field emission and sensor devices. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grown on TiN electrode layer with iron catalyst patterned by nano-imprint lithography (NIL), which allows the precise placement of individual CNTs on a substrate. The proposed techniques, including plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and NIL, are simple, inexpensive, and reproducible methods for fabrication of nano-scale devices in large areas. The catalyst patterns were defined by an array of circles with 200 nm in diameter, and variable lengths of pitch. The nano-patterned master and Fe catalyst were observed with good pattern fidelity over a large area by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nano-electrodes of MWCNTs had diameters ranging from 50 nm to 100 nm and lengths of about 300 nm. Field emission tests showed the reducing ignition voltage as the geometry of nanotube arrays was controlled by catalyst patterning. These results showed a wafer-scale approach to the control of the size, pitch, and position of nano-electrodes of nanotubes for various applications including electron field-emission sources, electrochemical probes, functionalized sensor elements, and so on.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3063-3068
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume257
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes
Field emission
Fabrication
Electrodes
Catalysts
Substrates
Lithography
Nanotubes
Sensors
Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition
Silicon wafers
Ignition
Microscopes
Iron
Scanning electron microscopy
Geometry
Electrons
Electric potential

Keywords

  • Carbon nanotube
  • Nano-electrode
  • Nano-imprint
  • Patterning
  • Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Fabrication of nano-electrode arrays of free-standing carbon nanotubes on nano-patterned substrate by imprint method. / Chang, W. S.; Kim, J. W.; Choi, D. G.; Han, Chang-Soo.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 257, No. 7, 01.01.2011, p. 3063-3068.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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