Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth

Jamie L. Hanson, Nicole Hair, Dinggang Shen, Feng Shi, John H. Gilmore, Barbara L. Wolfe, Seth D. Pollak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

162 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Living in poverty places children at very high risk for problems across a variety of domains, including schooling, behavioral regulation, and health. Aspects of cognitive functioning, such as information processing, may underlie these kinds of problems. How might poverty affect the brain functions underlying these cognitive processes? Here, we address this question by observing and analyzing repeated measures of brain development of young children between five months and four years of age from economically diverse backgrounds (n = 77). In doing so, we have the opportunity to observe changes in brain growth as children begin to experience the effects of poverty. These children underwent MRI scanning, with subjects completing between 1 and 7 scans longitudinally. Two hundred and three MRI scans were divided into different tissue types using a novel image processing algorithm specifically designed to analyze brain data from young infants. Total gray, white, and cerebral (summation of total gray and white matter) volumes were examined along with volumes of the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. Infants from low-income families had lower volumes of gray matter, tissue critical for processing of information and execution of actions. These differences were found for both the frontal and parietal lobes. No differences were detected in white matter, temporal lobe volumes, or occipital lobe volumes. In addition, differences in brain growth were found to vary with socioeconomic status (SES), with children from lower-income households having slower trajectories of growth during infancy and early childhood. Volumetric differences were associated with the emergence of disruptive behavioral problems.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere80954
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 11
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poverty
poverty
Brain
brain
low income households
Growth
Occipital Lobe
Parietal Lobe
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Automatic Data Processing
Tissue
behavior problems
infancy
socioeconomic status
Child Development
childhood
cognition
Social Class
Magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hanson, J. L., Hair, N., Shen, D., Shi, F., Gilmore, J. H., Wolfe, B. L., & Pollak, S. D. (2013). Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth. PLoS One, 8(12), [e80954]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080954

Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth. / Hanson, Jamie L.; Hair, Nicole; Shen, Dinggang; Shi, Feng; Gilmore, John H.; Wolfe, Barbara L.; Pollak, Seth D.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 12, e80954, 11.12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hanson, JL, Hair, N, Shen, D, Shi, F, Gilmore, JH, Wolfe, BL & Pollak, SD 2013, 'Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 12, e80954. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080954
Hanson JL, Hair N, Shen D, Shi F, Gilmore JH, Wolfe BL et al. Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth. PLoS One. 2013 Dec 11;8(12). e80954. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080954
Hanson, Jamie L. ; Hair, Nicole ; Shen, Dinggang ; Shi, Feng ; Gilmore, John H. ; Wolfe, Barbara L. ; Pollak, Seth D. / Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 12.
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