Fanconi's syndrome associated with prolonged adefovir dipivoxil therapy in a hepatitis B virus patient

Young Kul Jung, Jong Eun Yeon, Jong Hwan Choi, Chung Ho Kim, Eun Suk Jung, Ji Hoon Kim, Jong Jae Park, Jae Seon Kim, Young-Tae Bak, Kwan Soo Byun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is commonly used as an antiviral agent in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B or human immunodeficiency virus infection. Nephrotoxicity has been shown to occur at daily dosages of 60-120 mg. Fanconi's syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the renal proximal tubular cells, which is usually accompanied by complications. Here we report a case of Fanconi's syndrome in a chronic hepatitis B patient who had been treated with a prolonged regimen of ADV at 10 mg/day. A 47-year-old man complained of severe back and chest-wall pain. He had chronic hepatitis B and had been treated with ADV at a daily dose of 10 mg for 38 months. He was hospitalized because of severe bone pain, and laboratory and radiologic findings suggested a diagnosis of Fanconi's syndrome with osteomalacia. After discontinuation of the ADV, he recovered and was discharged from hospital. His laboratory findings had normalized within 2 weeks. This case indicates that Fanconi's syndrome can be acquired by a chronic hepatitis B patient taking ADV at a conventional dosage of 10 mg/day. Therefore, patients treated with long-term ADV should be checked regularly for the occurrence of ADV-induced Fanconi's syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-393
Number of pages5
JournalGut and Liver
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Fanconi Syndrome
Hepatitis B virus
Chronic Hepatitis B
Therapeutics
Osteomalacia
Thoracic Wall
Virus Diseases
adefovir dipivoxil
Chest Pain
Antiviral Agents
HIV
Bone and Bones
Pain

Keywords

  • Adefovir
  • Chronic hepatitis B
  • Fanconi syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Fanconi's syndrome associated with prolonged adefovir dipivoxil therapy in a hepatitis B virus patient. / Jung, Young Kul; Yeon, Jong Eun; Choi, Jong Hwan; Kim, Chung Ho; Jung, Eun Suk; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Jong Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo.

In: Gut and Liver, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 389-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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