Fatty acid increases cAMP-dependent lactate and MAO-B-dependent GABA production in mouse Astrocytes by activating a Gαs protein-coupled receptor

Na Hye Lee, Moonsun Sa, Yu Ri Hong, Changjoon Lee, Jae Hyung Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are mostly generated from dietary triglycerides and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Astrocytes in the brain use MCFAs as an alternative energy source. In addition, MCFAs have various regulatory and signaling functions in astrocytes. However, it is unclear how astrocytes sense and take up MCFAs. This study demonstrates that decanoic acid (DA; C10), a saturated MCFA and a ligand of Gαs protein-coupled receptors (Gαs-GPCRs), is a signaling molecule in energy metabolism in primary astrocytes. cAMP synthesis and lactate release were increased via a putative Gαs-GPCR and transmembrane adenylyl cyclase upon short-term treatment with DA. By contrast, monoamine oxidase B-dependent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis was increased in primary cortical and hypothalamic astrocytes upon long-term treatment with DA. Thus, astrocytes respond to DA by synthesizing cAMP and releasing lactate upon short-term treatment, and by synthesizing and releasing GABA upon long-term treatment, similar to reactive astrocytes. Our data suggest that astrocytes in the brain play crucial roles in lipid-sensing via GPCRs and modulate neuronal metabolism or activity by releasing lactate via astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle or GABA to influence neighboring neurons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-376
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Neurobiology
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 1

Keywords

  • Astrocytes
  • CAMP
  • Decanoic acid
  • Gamma-aminobutyric acid
  • Lactate
  • Medium-chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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