Feasibility of biohydrogen production from Gelidium amansii

Jeong Hoon Park, Jeong Jun Yoon, Hee-Deung Park, Yong Jin Kim, Dong Jung Lim, Sang Hyoun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The feasibility of hydrogen production from red algae was investigated. Galactose, the main sugar monomer of red algae, was readily converted to hydrogen by dark fermentation. The maximum hydrogen production rate and yield of galactose were 2.46 L H2/g VSS/d and 2.03 mol H2/mol galactoseadded, respectively, which were higher than those for glucose (0.914 L H2/g VSS/d and 1.48 mol H2/mol galactoseadded). The distribution of soluble byproducts showed that H2 production was the main pathway of galactose uptake. 5-HMF, the main byproduct of acid hydrolysis of red algae causes noncompetitive inhibition of H2 fermentation. 1.37 g/L of 5-HMF decreased hydrogen production rate by 50% compared to the control. When red algae was hydrolyzed at 150 °C for 15 min and detoxified by activated carbon, 53.5 mL of H2 was produced from 1 g of dry algae with a hydrogen production rate of 0.518 L H 2/g VSS/d. Red algae, cultivable on vast tracts of sea by sunlight without any nitrogen-based fertilizer, could be a suitable substrate for biohydrogen production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13997-14003
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
Volume36
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Oct 1

Fingerprint

algae
Algae
hydrogen production
Hydrogen production
galactose
fermentation
Fermentation
Byproducts
Enzyme inhibition
fertilizers
Hydrogen
activated carbon
sunlight
Fertilizers
sugars
glucose
Sugars
Activated carbon
Glucose
hydrolysis

Keywords

  • Dark fermentation
  • Galactose
  • Pretreatment
  • Red algae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

Cite this

Feasibility of biohydrogen production from Gelidium amansii. / Park, Jeong Hoon; Yoon, Jeong Jun; Park, Hee-Deung; Kim, Yong Jin; Lim, Dong Jung; Kim, Sang Hyoun.

In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol. 36, No. 21, 01.10.2011, p. 13997-14003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Jeong Hoon ; Yoon, Jeong Jun ; Park, Hee-Deung ; Kim, Yong Jin ; Lim, Dong Jung ; Kim, Sang Hyoun. / Feasibility of biohydrogen production from Gelidium amansii. In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 21. pp. 13997-14003.
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