Features causing confusion between basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in clinical diagnosis

Tea Hyung Ryu, Heesang Kye, Jae Eun Choi, Hyo Hyun Ahn, Young Chul Kye, Soo-Hong Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) can be easily diagnosed clinically, proper diagnosis is sometimes difficult when based on clinical information alone. Objective: To know what causes clinical misdiagnosis between SCC and BCC, and evaluate whether dermoscopy can improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods: Clinical and dermoscopic photographs of inversely diagnosed cases (histologically confirmed BCC with a clinical impression of SCC or vice versa) were randomly presented to six dermatologists and the reasons for each correct or incorrect diagnosis were analyzed. Results: Among 154 cases (SCCs or BCCs), 13 cases were inversely diagnosed; 9 SCCs were clinically misdiagnosed as BCC and 4 BCCs were clinically misdiagnosed as SCC. Clinically, scales, pigmentation and rolled border were meaningful factors to discern two carcinomas. Scales without both pigmentation and rolled border was favored for SCC, but BCC favored vice versa. Ulceration, telangiectasia and translucency contributed as confusing factors for proper diagnosis. Dermoscopy improved overall diagnostic accuracy to odds ratio 2.86. Conclusion: SCC has a higher tendency to be clinically misdiagnosed as BCC than vice versa. Pigmentation and rolled border are factors causing misdiagnosis of SCC as BCC and BCC may be misdiagnosed as SCC in the presence of scaling. Dermoscopy seems to improve the clinical diagnostic accuracy but has limitations for some ambiguous lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-70
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Dermatology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 1

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Basal Cell Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Diagnostic Errors
Dermoscopy
Pigmentation
Telangiectasis
Odds Ratio
Carcinoma

Keywords

  • Basal cell carcinoma
  • Dermoscopy
  • Diagnostic errors
  • Squamous cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Features causing confusion between basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in clinical diagnosis. / Ryu, Tea Hyung; Kye, Heesang; Choi, Jae Eun; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul; Seo, Soo-Hong.

In: Annals of Dermatology, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 64-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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