Finding ridges and valleys in a discrete surface using a modified MLS approximation

Soo Kyun Kim, Chang-Hun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Implicit surface fitting is a promising approach to finding ridges and valleys in discrete surfaces, but existing techniques are time-consuming and rely on user-supplied tuning parameters. We use a modified MLS (moving-least-squares) approximation technique to estimate the local differential information near a vertex by means of an approximating surface. Ridge and valley vertices are easily detected as zero-crossings, and can then be connected along the direction of principal curvature. Our method, demonstrated on several large meshed models, produces a good fit which leads to improved visualization. It does not oscillate and is quick to compute.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1533-1542
Number of pages10
JournalCAD Computer Aided Design
Volume37
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Least squares approximations
Moving Least-squares Approximation
Ridge
Implicit Surfaces
Surface Fitting
Zero-crossing
Principal curvature
Parameter Tuning
Visualization
Vertex of a graph
Tuning
Estimate
Model

Keywords

  • Curvature extrema
  • Moving-least-squares
  • Ridge lines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Geometry and Topology

Cite this

Finding ridges and valleys in a discrete surface using a modified MLS approximation. / Kim, Soo Kyun; Kim, Chang-Hun.

In: CAD Computer Aided Design, Vol. 37, No. 14, 01.12.2005, p. 1533-1542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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