FSR1 is essential for virulence and female fertility in Fusarium verticilliodes and F. graminearum

Won Bo Shim, Uma Shankar Sagaram, Yoon-E Choi, Jinny So, Heather H. Wilkinson, Yin Won Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) and F. graminearum (teleomorph G. zeae) are well known to cause devastating diseases on cereal crops. Despite their importance, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these host-pathogen interactions is limited. The FSR1 locus in F. verticillioides was identified by screening REMI mutants for loss of virulence in maize stalk rot inoculation studies. FSR1 encodes an 823-codon open reading frame interrupted by two introns. The Fsr1 protein shares 60% sequence identity with the Sordaria macrospora Pro11, a multimodular protein with four putative protein-protein binding domains (caveolin-binding domain, coiled-coil structure, calmodulin-binding motif, and seven-WD40 repeats), which plays a regulatory role in cell differentiation and ascocarp development. Our data demonstrate that FSR1 is essential for female fertility and virulence in F. verticillioides. Significantly, targeted disruption of the FSR1 ortholog in F. graminearum (FgFSR1) reduced virulence on barley and deterred perithecia formation. Cross-complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene function is conserved in the two Fusarium species. FSR1 is expressed constitutively, and we hypothesize that Fsr1 regulates virulence by acting as a scaffold for a signal transduction pathway. A survey of available genome databases indicates Fsr1 homologs are present in a number of filamentous fungi and animal systems but not in budding yeast or plants. A maximum likelihood analysis of this gene family reveals well-supported monophyletic clades associated with fungi and animals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-733
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

female fertility
Fusarium graminearum
Fusarium
Fertility
Virulence
virulence
Fungi
Moniliformis
Gibberella
Caveolins
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Proteins
Saccharomycetales
probability analysis
ascomata
fungi
host-pathogen relationships
proteins
corn stover
protein binding

Keywords

  • Mating
  • Pathogenicity
  • Protein interaction
  • Scab
  • Striatin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

FSR1 is essential for virulence and female fertility in Fusarium verticilliodes and F. graminearum. / Shim, Won Bo; Sagaram, Uma Shankar; Choi, Yoon-E; So, Jinny; Wilkinson, Heather H.; Lee, Yin Won.

In: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, Vol. 19, No. 7, 01.07.2006, p. 725-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shim, Won Bo ; Sagaram, Uma Shankar ; Choi, Yoon-E ; So, Jinny ; Wilkinson, Heather H. ; Lee, Yin Won. / FSR1 is essential for virulence and female fertility in Fusarium verticilliodes and F. graminearum. In: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 7. pp. 725-733.
@article{d1094369438742cdb0ec5470fb8668a3,
title = "FSR1 is essential for virulence and female fertility in Fusarium verticilliodes and F. graminearum",
abstract = "Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) and F. graminearum (teleomorph G. zeae) are well known to cause devastating diseases on cereal crops. Despite their importance, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these host-pathogen interactions is limited. The FSR1 locus in F. verticillioides was identified by screening REMI mutants for loss of virulence in maize stalk rot inoculation studies. FSR1 encodes an 823-codon open reading frame interrupted by two introns. The Fsr1 protein shares 60{\%} sequence identity with the Sordaria macrospora Pro11, a multimodular protein with four putative protein-protein binding domains (caveolin-binding domain, coiled-coil structure, calmodulin-binding motif, and seven-WD40 repeats), which plays a regulatory role in cell differentiation and ascocarp development. Our data demonstrate that FSR1 is essential for female fertility and virulence in F. verticillioides. Significantly, targeted disruption of the FSR1 ortholog in F. graminearum (FgFSR1) reduced virulence on barley and deterred perithecia formation. Cross-complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene function is conserved in the two Fusarium species. FSR1 is expressed constitutively, and we hypothesize that Fsr1 regulates virulence by acting as a scaffold for a signal transduction pathway. A survey of available genome databases indicates Fsr1 homologs are present in a number of filamentous fungi and animal systems but not in budding yeast or plants. A maximum likelihood analysis of this gene family reveals well-supported monophyletic clades associated with fungi and animals.",
keywords = "Mating, Pathogenicity, Protein interaction, Scab, Striatin",
author = "Shim, {Won Bo} and Sagaram, {Uma Shankar} and Yoon-E Choi and Jinny So and Wilkinson, {Heather H.} and Lee, {Yin Won}",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1094/MPMI-19-0725",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "725--733",
journal = "Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions",
issn = "0894-0282",
publisher = "American Phytopathological Society",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - FSR1 is essential for virulence and female fertility in Fusarium verticilliodes and F. graminearum

AU - Shim, Won Bo

AU - Sagaram, Uma Shankar

AU - Choi, Yoon-E

AU - So, Jinny

AU - Wilkinson, Heather H.

AU - Lee, Yin Won

PY - 2006/7/1

Y1 - 2006/7/1

N2 - Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) and F. graminearum (teleomorph G. zeae) are well known to cause devastating diseases on cereal crops. Despite their importance, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these host-pathogen interactions is limited. The FSR1 locus in F. verticillioides was identified by screening REMI mutants for loss of virulence in maize stalk rot inoculation studies. FSR1 encodes an 823-codon open reading frame interrupted by two introns. The Fsr1 protein shares 60% sequence identity with the Sordaria macrospora Pro11, a multimodular protein with four putative protein-protein binding domains (caveolin-binding domain, coiled-coil structure, calmodulin-binding motif, and seven-WD40 repeats), which plays a regulatory role in cell differentiation and ascocarp development. Our data demonstrate that FSR1 is essential for female fertility and virulence in F. verticillioides. Significantly, targeted disruption of the FSR1 ortholog in F. graminearum (FgFSR1) reduced virulence on barley and deterred perithecia formation. Cross-complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene function is conserved in the two Fusarium species. FSR1 is expressed constitutively, and we hypothesize that Fsr1 regulates virulence by acting as a scaffold for a signal transduction pathway. A survey of available genome databases indicates Fsr1 homologs are present in a number of filamentous fungi and animal systems but not in budding yeast or plants. A maximum likelihood analysis of this gene family reveals well-supported monophyletic clades associated with fungi and animals.

AB - Fusarium verticillioides (teleomorph Gibberella moniliformis) and F. graminearum (teleomorph G. zeae) are well known to cause devastating diseases on cereal crops. Despite their importance, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these host-pathogen interactions is limited. The FSR1 locus in F. verticillioides was identified by screening REMI mutants for loss of virulence in maize stalk rot inoculation studies. FSR1 encodes an 823-codon open reading frame interrupted by two introns. The Fsr1 protein shares 60% sequence identity with the Sordaria macrospora Pro11, a multimodular protein with four putative protein-protein binding domains (caveolin-binding domain, coiled-coil structure, calmodulin-binding motif, and seven-WD40 repeats), which plays a regulatory role in cell differentiation and ascocarp development. Our data demonstrate that FSR1 is essential for female fertility and virulence in F. verticillioides. Significantly, targeted disruption of the FSR1 ortholog in F. graminearum (FgFSR1) reduced virulence on barley and deterred perithecia formation. Cross-complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene function is conserved in the two Fusarium species. FSR1 is expressed constitutively, and we hypothesize that Fsr1 regulates virulence by acting as a scaffold for a signal transduction pathway. A survey of available genome databases indicates Fsr1 homologs are present in a number of filamentous fungi and animal systems but not in budding yeast or plants. A maximum likelihood analysis of this gene family reveals well-supported monophyletic clades associated with fungi and animals.

KW - Mating

KW - Pathogenicity

KW - Protein interaction

KW - Scab

KW - Striatin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745700272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745700272&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1094/MPMI-19-0725

DO - 10.1094/MPMI-19-0725

M3 - Article

C2 - 16838785

AN - SCOPUS:33745700272

VL - 19

SP - 725

EP - 733

JO - Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions

JF - Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions

SN - 0894-0282

IS - 7

ER -