Gait electromyography in children with myelomeningocele at the sacral level

Byung Kyu Park, Hae Ryong Song, Stephen J. Vankoski, Carolyn A. Moore, Luciano S. Dias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Patients with sacral level myelomeningocele can be expected to maintain a high level of ambulatory status long into adulthood. Gait deterioration and knee pain reported in this population may be attributed to compensatory movements and increased recruitment of less affected muscle groups to achieve this desired level of ambulation. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of the solid ankle-foot-orthoses (AFOs) on the muscular activity of selected muscles during walking. Design: Cohort/outcome. Setting: Laboratory. Patients: Twenty four patients with sacral level myelomeningocele between 4 to 17 years of age. Intervention: Electromyographic activity of selected muscle groups were studied during barefoot walking and walking with solid AFOs at a self-selected walking velocity. Main Outcome Measures: Timing of electromyographic activity and sagittal plane knee kinematics. Comparison to normal elcctromyographic patterns and changes between barefoot and AFO walking conditions. Results: With the AFOs there was significantly less prolonged stance phase quadriceps activity compared with barefoot walking, although greater than normal activity persisted. There was no change between conditions for the other monitored muscle groups. All muscles elicited greater duration of activity over the course of the gait cycle. Conclusions: Our results show that solid AFOs improve the prolonged knee extensor activity evident for barefoot walking. This is clinically relevant to the gait deterioration and knee pain sometimes seen in this patient population. We espouse early and persistent orthotic intervention to reduce compensatory muscular overactivity and maintain gait quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume78
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997 May 1

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Meningomyelocele
Electromyography
Gait
Walking
Foot Orthoses
Ankle
Knee
Muscles
Pain
Biomechanical Phenomena
Population
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Gait electromyography in children with myelomeningocele at the sacral level. / Park, Byung Kyu; Song, Hae Ryong; Vankoski, Stephen J.; Moore, Carolyn A.; Dias, Luciano S.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 78, No. 5, 01.05.1997, p. 471-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, Byung Kyu ; Song, Hae Ryong ; Vankoski, Stephen J. ; Moore, Carolyn A. ; Dias, Luciano S. / Gait electromyography in children with myelomeningocele at the sacral level. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1997 ; Vol. 78, No. 5. pp. 471-475.
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