Gait speed and handgrip strength as predictors of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in hemodialysis patients

Yu Ho Lee, Jin Sug Kim, Su Woong Jung, Hyeon Seok Hwang, Ju Young Moon, Kyung Hwan Jeong, Sang Ho Lee, So Young Lee, Gang Jee Ko, Dong Young Lee, Hong Joo Lee, Yang Gyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low physical performance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis is associated with a high mortality rate. We investigated the clinical relevance of gait speed and handgrip strength, the two most commonly used methods of assessing physical performance. Methods: We obtained data regarding gait speed and handgrip strength from 277 hemodialysis patients and evaluated their relationships with baseline parameters, mental health, plasma inflammatory markers, and major adverse clinical outcomes. Low physical performance was defined by the recommendations suggested by the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia. Results: The prevalence of low gait speed and handgrip strength was 28.2 and 44.8%, respectively. Old age, low serum albumin levels, high comorbidity index score, and impaired cognitive functions were associated with low physical performance. Patients with isolated low gait speed exhibited a general trend for worse quality of life than those with isolated low handgrip strength. Gait speed and handgrip strength showed very weak correlations with different determining factors (older age, the presence of diabetes, and lower serum albumin level for low gait speed, and lower body mass index and the presence of previous cardiovascular events for low handgrip strength). Patients with low gait speed and handgrip strength had elevated levels of plasma endocan and matrix metalloproteinase-7 and the highest risks for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events among the groups (adjusted hazard ratio of 2.72, p = 0.024). Elderly patients with low gait speed and handgrip strength were at the highest risk for poor clinical outcomes. Conclusion: Gait speed and handgrip strength reflected distinctive aspects of patient characteristics and the use of both factors improved the prediction of adverse clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients. Gait speed seems to be a better indicator of poor patient outcomes than is handgrip strength.

Original languageEnglish
Article number166
JournalBMC Nephrology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 6

Keywords

  • Gait speed
  • Handgrip strength
  • Hemodialysis
  • Mortality
  • Physical performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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