Gas and water vapor barrier properties of edible films from protein and cellulosic materials

Hyun Jin Park, Manjeet S. Chinnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

219 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Edible films were made from proteins (corn-zein and wheat gluten) and celluloses (methyl cellulose and hydroxypropyl cellulose), and tested for permeability of gases. Oxygen and carbon dioxide permeabilities of edible films were generally lower than those of plastic films. However, water vapor permeabilities of edible films were higher than those of plastic films. The concentration of plasticizer significantly affected the permeability of gases. The gas permeabilities, O2, CO2 and water vapor, of cellulose films increased as the concentration of plasticizer increased. Addition of lipid (Myvacet 7-00) in the hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) film decreased the gas permeability. Linear relationships were found between permeability of gases and film thickness in protein films.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-507
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Food Engineering
Volume25
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

cellulosic materials
edible films
Steam
water vapor
Permeability
permeability
Gases
gases
films (materials)
cellulose
Proteins
proteins
Plasticizers
plasticizers
plastic film
Cellulose
Plastics
carbon dioxide
Zein
corn protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Gas and water vapor barrier properties of edible films from protein and cellulosic materials. / Park, Hyun Jin; Chinnan, Manjeet S.

In: Journal of Food Engineering, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.12.1995, p. 497-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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