Gender, occupational, and socioeconomic correlates of alcohol and drug abuse among U.S. rural, metropolitan, and urban residents

Chamberlain C. Diala, Carles Muntaner, Christine Walrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the prevalence and correlates of alcohol and drug abuse and dependence among rural, urban, and metropolitan U.S. residents. Methods: The National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) (1990-1992) yielded lifetime risks of psychiatric disorders in a probability sample of 8098 respondents in the 48 contiguous states using DSM-III-R for diagnosis. Logistic regressions of alcohol and drug disorders were performed to compare their correlates in rural, urban, and metropolitan areas after stratifying by demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results: Household income was protective only in rural areas. High occupation strata were positively associated with alcohol disorders. Urban and metropolitan women were less likely to report drug disorders. There was no gender difference in rural drug abuse and dependence. Also, high occupation strata were positively associated with drug disorders. Conclusion: Lack of gender differences in rural drug disorders may indicate an increase in drug availability, access, and use among rural women. Workplace alcohol and drug disorders, especially among metropolitan sales, crafts, and service workers should be of concern to policymakers. These results underline the usefulness of using multiple indicators of socioeconomic positions in epidemiologic studies of substance use disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-428
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jun 28
Externally publishedYes

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Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Alcohols
Occupations
Sampling Studies
Workplace
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Gender, occupational, and socioeconomic correlates of alcohol and drug abuse among U.S. rural, metropolitan, and urban residents. / Diala, Chamberlain C.; Muntaner, Carles; Walrath, Christine.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 30, No. 2, 28.06.2004, p. 409-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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