Glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria

Association with mortality and renal progression in a prospective cohort of a community-based elderly population

Se Won Oh, Sejoong Kim, Ki Young Na, Ki Woong Kim, Dong Wan Chae, Ho Jun Chin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited prospective data are available on the importance of estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria in the prediction of all-cause mortality (ACM) in community-based elderly populations. We examined the relationship between GFR or proteinuria and ACM in 949 randomly selected community-dwelling elderly subjects (aged ≥65 years) over a 5-year period. A spot urine sample was used to measure proteinuria by the dipstick test, and GFR was estimated using the chronic kidney disease-epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Information about mortality and causes of death was collected by direct enquiry with the subjects and from the national mortality data. Compared to subjects without proteinuria, those with proteinuria of grade ≥1+ had a 1.725-fold (1.134-2.625) higher risk of ACM. Compared to subjects with GFR ≥90 ml/min/1.73 m2, those with GFR<45 ml/min/1.73 m2 had a 2.357 -fold (1.170-4.750) higher risk for ACM. Among the 403 subjects included in the analysis of renal progression, the annual rate of GFR change during follow-up period was -0.52±2.35 ml/min/1.73 m 2/year. The renal progression rate was 7.315-fold (1.841-29.071) higher in subjects with GFR<0 ml/min/1.73 m2 than in those with GFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Among a community-dwelling elderly Korean population, decreased GFR of <45 ml/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria were independent risk factors for ACM.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere94120
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Apr 7
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

glomerular filtration rate
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Proteinuria
kidneys
Kidney
Mortality
Population
Independent Living
proteinuria
Epidemiology
kidney diseases
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
epidemiology
Cause of Death
urine
risk factors
Urine
death
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria : Association with mortality and renal progression in a prospective cohort of a community-based elderly population. / Oh, Se Won; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Ki Woong; Chae, Dong Wan; Chin, Ho Jun.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 4, e94120, 07.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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