Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers

Yoon Ho Kim, Soon Hong Kwon, Jung Min Lee, Min Soo Hwang, Ju Hyung Kang, Won Il Park, Hong Kyu Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Active nanophotonic devices are attractive due to their low-power consumption, ultrafast modulation speed and high-density integration. Although electrical operation is required for practical implementation of these devices, it is not straightforward to introduce a proper current path into such a wavelength-scale nanostructure without affecting the optical properties. For example, to demonstrate electrically driven nanolasers, complicated fabrication techniques have been used thus far. Here we report an electrically driven microdisk laser using a transparent graphene electrode. Current is injected efficiently through the graphene sheet covering the top surface of the microdisk cavity, and, for the first time, lasing operation was achieved with a low-threshold current of ∼300 μA at room temperature. In addition, we measured significant electroluminescence from a graphene-contact subwavelength-scale single nanopillar structure. This work represents a new paradigm for the practical applications of integrated photonic systems, by conformally mounting graphene on the complex surfaces of non-planar three-dimensional nanostructures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1123
JournalNature Communications
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Nov 26

Fingerprint

Graphite
graphene
Lasers
Nanostructures
lasers
Optics and Photonics
Nanophotonics
Equipment and Supplies
Electroluminescence
mounting
Mountings
threshold currents
electroluminescence
Photonics
lasing
Electrodes
coverings
Electric power utilization
Optical properties
Modulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Kim, Y. H., Kwon, S. H., Lee, J. M., Hwang, M. S., Kang, J. H., Park, W. I., & Park, H. K. (2012). Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers. Nature Communications, 3, [1123]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2137

Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers. / Kim, Yoon Ho; Kwon, Soon Hong; Lee, Jung Min; Hwang, Min Soo; Kang, Ju Hyung; Park, Won Il; Park, Hong Kyu.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 3, 1123, 26.11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, YH, Kwon, SH, Lee, JM, Hwang, MS, Kang, JH, Park, WI & Park, HK 2012, 'Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers', Nature Communications, vol. 3, 1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2137
Kim YH, Kwon SH, Lee JM, Hwang MS, Kang JH, Park WI et al. Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers. Nature Communications. 2012 Nov 26;3. 1123. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2137
Kim, Yoon Ho ; Kwon, Soon Hong ; Lee, Jung Min ; Hwang, Min Soo ; Kang, Ju Hyung ; Park, Won Il ; Park, Hong Kyu. / Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers. In: Nature Communications. 2012 ; Vol. 3.
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