High Axial Loads While Walking Increase Anterior Tibial Translation in Intact and Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees

Jae Gyoon Kim, Tae Soo Bae, Sang Hak Lee, Ki-Mo Jang, Ju Seon Jeong, Bong Soo Kyung, Hong Chul Lim, Jin Hwan Ahn, Ji Hoon Bae, Joon Ho Wang

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of high axial loading (AL) on anterior tibial translation (ATT) according to the increase in knee flexion and the effect of valgus stress (VS) and internal rotation (IR) combined with high AL in intact and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees according to the increase in knee flexion.

METHODS: We used 10 fresh-frozen, human cadaveric knees. Different loading conditions (134-N anterior drawer, 1,000-N AL, 10-Nm VS, and 5-Nm IR) were sequentially combined, and ATT was measured at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of flexion in the intact and ACL-deficient knees.

RESULTS: ATT increased significantly by adding high AL in intact knees (P = .001) and ACL-deficient knees (P < .0001) according to the change in flexion angle (P < .0001). Under high AL, ATT in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly larger than that in the intact knees for all loading conditions, and it also increased gradually according to the increase in knee flexion (P = .0001). ATT increased significantly after adding IR or VS with high AL in intact knees (VS, P = .002; VS/IR, P = .03) and ACL-deficient knees (VS, P = .0004) at some of the flexion angles.

CONCLUSIONS: The added high AL increased ATT in intact and ACL-deficient knees from 0° to 60° of flexion. The effect of high AL on ATT became greater in ACL-deficient knees than in intact knees, and ATT also gradually increased according to the increase in knee flexion from 0° to 60°. In both the intact and ACL-deficient knees, ATT increased significantly after valgus stress or IR from 0° to 60°.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: ATT during weight bearing increases stress to the ACL, which worsens with valgus stress and/or IR forces. This finding should be considered when one is studying ACL injury mechanisms, as well as prescribing rehabilitation after ACL surgery.

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Walking
Knee
Weight-Bearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{e87695a65b78419e96233d305aa69f64,
title = "High Axial Loads While Walking Increase Anterior Tibial Translation in Intact and Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of high axial loading (AL) on anterior tibial translation (ATT) according to the increase in knee flexion and the effect of valgus stress (VS) and internal rotation (IR) combined with high AL in intact and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees according to the increase in knee flexion.METHODS: We used 10 fresh-frozen, human cadaveric knees. Different loading conditions (134-N anterior drawer, 1,000-N AL, 10-Nm VS, and 5-Nm IR) were sequentially combined, and ATT was measured at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of flexion in the intact and ACL-deficient knees.RESULTS: ATT increased significantly by adding high AL in intact knees (P = .001) and ACL-deficient knees (P < .0001) according to the change in flexion angle (P < .0001). Under high AL, ATT in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly larger than that in the intact knees for all loading conditions, and it also increased gradually according to the increase in knee flexion (P = .0001). ATT increased significantly after adding IR or VS with high AL in intact knees (VS, P = .002; VS/IR, P = .03) and ACL-deficient knees (VS, P = .0004) at some of the flexion angles.CONCLUSIONS: The added high AL increased ATT in intact and ACL-deficient knees from 0° to 60° of flexion. The effect of high AL on ATT became greater in ACL-deficient knees than in intact knees, and ATT also gradually increased according to the increase in knee flexion from 0° to 60°. In both the intact and ACL-deficient knees, ATT increased significantly after valgus stress or IR from 0° to 60°.CLINICAL RELEVANCE: ATT during weight bearing increases stress to the ACL, which worsens with valgus stress and/or IR forces. This finding should be considered when one is studying ACL injury mechanisms, as well as prescribing rehabilitation after ACL surgery.",
author = "Kim, {Jae Gyoon} and Bae, {Tae Soo} and Lee, {Sang Hak} and Ki-Mo Jang and Jeong, {Ju Seon} and Kyung, {Bong Soo} and Lim, {Hong Chul} and Ahn, {Jin Hwan} and Bae, {Ji Hoon} and Wang, {Joon Ho}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.arthro.2015.01.030",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "1289--1295",
journal = "Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery",
issn = "0749-8063",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High Axial Loads While Walking Increase Anterior Tibial Translation in Intact and Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees

AU - Kim, Jae Gyoon

AU - Bae, Tae Soo

AU - Lee, Sang Hak

AU - Jang, Ki-Mo

AU - Jeong, Ju Seon

AU - Kyung, Bong Soo

AU - Lim, Hong Chul

AU - Ahn, Jin Hwan

AU - Bae, Ji Hoon

AU - Wang, Joon Ho

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of high axial loading (AL) on anterior tibial translation (ATT) according to the increase in knee flexion and the effect of valgus stress (VS) and internal rotation (IR) combined with high AL in intact and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees according to the increase in knee flexion.METHODS: We used 10 fresh-frozen, human cadaveric knees. Different loading conditions (134-N anterior drawer, 1,000-N AL, 10-Nm VS, and 5-Nm IR) were sequentially combined, and ATT was measured at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of flexion in the intact and ACL-deficient knees.RESULTS: ATT increased significantly by adding high AL in intact knees (P = .001) and ACL-deficient knees (P < .0001) according to the change in flexion angle (P < .0001). Under high AL, ATT in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly larger than that in the intact knees for all loading conditions, and it also increased gradually according to the increase in knee flexion (P = .0001). ATT increased significantly after adding IR or VS with high AL in intact knees (VS, P = .002; VS/IR, P = .03) and ACL-deficient knees (VS, P = .0004) at some of the flexion angles.CONCLUSIONS: The added high AL increased ATT in intact and ACL-deficient knees from 0° to 60° of flexion. The effect of high AL on ATT became greater in ACL-deficient knees than in intact knees, and ATT also gradually increased according to the increase in knee flexion from 0° to 60°. In both the intact and ACL-deficient knees, ATT increased significantly after valgus stress or IR from 0° to 60°.CLINICAL RELEVANCE: ATT during weight bearing increases stress to the ACL, which worsens with valgus stress and/or IR forces. This finding should be considered when one is studying ACL injury mechanisms, as well as prescribing rehabilitation after ACL surgery.

AB - PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of high axial loading (AL) on anterior tibial translation (ATT) according to the increase in knee flexion and the effect of valgus stress (VS) and internal rotation (IR) combined with high AL in intact and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees according to the increase in knee flexion.METHODS: We used 10 fresh-frozen, human cadaveric knees. Different loading conditions (134-N anterior drawer, 1,000-N AL, 10-Nm VS, and 5-Nm IR) were sequentially combined, and ATT was measured at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of flexion in the intact and ACL-deficient knees.RESULTS: ATT increased significantly by adding high AL in intact knees (P = .001) and ACL-deficient knees (P < .0001) according to the change in flexion angle (P < .0001). Under high AL, ATT in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly larger than that in the intact knees for all loading conditions, and it also increased gradually according to the increase in knee flexion (P = .0001). ATT increased significantly after adding IR or VS with high AL in intact knees (VS, P = .002; VS/IR, P = .03) and ACL-deficient knees (VS, P = .0004) at some of the flexion angles.CONCLUSIONS: The added high AL increased ATT in intact and ACL-deficient knees from 0° to 60° of flexion. The effect of high AL on ATT became greater in ACL-deficient knees than in intact knees, and ATT also gradually increased according to the increase in knee flexion from 0° to 60°. In both the intact and ACL-deficient knees, ATT increased significantly after valgus stress or IR from 0° to 60°.CLINICAL RELEVANCE: ATT during weight bearing increases stress to the ACL, which worsens with valgus stress and/or IR forces. This finding should be considered when one is studying ACL injury mechanisms, as well as prescribing rehabilitation after ACL surgery.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.arthro.2015.01.030

DO - 10.1016/j.arthro.2015.01.030

M3 - Article

C2 - 25842990

AN - SCOPUS:84937439262

VL - 31

SP - 1289

EP - 1295

JO - Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

JF - Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery

SN - 0749-8063

IS - 7

ER -