High insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with bipolar i disorder: A trait marker?

Yong Ku Kim, Kyoung Sae Na, Jung A. Hwang, Ho-Kyoung Yoon, Heon-Jeong Lee, Sang Woo Hahn, Bun Hee Lee, Han Yong Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Neurotrophic factors exert substantial effects on the central nervous system. The present study investigates the roles of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder. Methods Baseline levels of culture-stimulated IGF-1, β-NGF, and BDNF were compared in 116 patients with bipolar I disorder and 123 healthy controls. Neurotrophic factors were also compared in patients before and after 6 weeks of pharmacotherapy. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the influence of the neurotrophic factors analyzed in quartile form, in relation to confounding variables, such as age, sex, and body mass index. Results IGF-1 was significantly higher in patients (mean=514.57, SD=259.78) than in healthy controls (mean=316.82, SD=270.00, p<0.0001) at baseline. Furthermore, higher levels of IGF-1 substantially increased the risk for bipolar I disorder. IGF-1 level was not significantly changed at 6-weeks (mean=506.41, SD=313.66). No changes in BDNF or β-NGF-1 levels were found following the 6-week treatment period. IGF-1 and β-NGF were negatively correlated in healthy controls, but not in patients. Severity of manic symptoms was not associated with any of the neurotrophic factors. Limitations We did not measure cortisol, growth hormone, or IGF-1 receptors. This study is cross-sectional in design. Conclusions Elevated IGF-1 levels may be a trait marker for bipolar disorder. Further studies are needed to thoroughly investigate the role of IGF-1 in relation to other neuroendocrine factors and biological markers for bipolar disorder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-743
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume151
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Nov 1

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Somatomedins
Bipolar Disorder
Nerve Growth Factors
Nerve Growth Factor
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Somatomedin Receptors
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Growth Hormone
Hydrocortisone
Body Mass Index
Central Nervous System
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Brain-derived neurotrophic factor
  • Insulin-like growth factor-1
  • Nerve growth factor
  • Neurotrophin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

High insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with bipolar i disorder : A trait marker? / Kim, Yong Ku; Na, Kyoung Sae; Hwang, Jung A.; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Hahn, Sang Woo; Lee, Bun Hee; Jung, Han Yong.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 151, No. 2, 01.11.2013, p. 738-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Yong Ku ; Na, Kyoung Sae ; Hwang, Jung A. ; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung ; Lee, Heon-Jeong ; Hahn, Sang Woo ; Lee, Bun Hee ; Jung, Han Yong. / High insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with bipolar i disorder : A trait marker?. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2013 ; Vol. 151, No. 2. pp. 738-743.
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abstract = "Objectives Neurotrophic factors exert substantial effects on the central nervous system. The present study investigates the roles of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder. Methods Baseline levels of culture-stimulated IGF-1, β-NGF, and BDNF were compared in 116 patients with bipolar I disorder and 123 healthy controls. Neurotrophic factors were also compared in patients before and after 6 weeks of pharmacotherapy. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the influence of the neurotrophic factors analyzed in quartile form, in relation to confounding variables, such as age, sex, and body mass index. Results IGF-1 was significantly higher in patients (mean=514.57, SD=259.78) than in healthy controls (mean=316.82, SD=270.00, p<0.0001) at baseline. Furthermore, higher levels of IGF-1 substantially increased the risk for bipolar I disorder. IGF-1 level was not significantly changed at 6-weeks (mean=506.41, SD=313.66). No changes in BDNF or β-NGF-1 levels were found following the 6-week treatment period. IGF-1 and β-NGF were negatively correlated in healthy controls, but not in patients. Severity of manic symptoms was not associated with any of the neurotrophic factors. Limitations We did not measure cortisol, growth hormone, or IGF-1 receptors. This study is cross-sectional in design. Conclusions Elevated IGF-1 levels may be a trait marker for bipolar disorder. Further studies are needed to thoroughly investigate the role of IGF-1 in relation to other neuroendocrine factors and biological markers for bipolar disorder.",
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T1 - High insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with bipolar i disorder

T2 - A trait marker?

AU - Kim, Yong Ku

AU - Na, Kyoung Sae

AU - Hwang, Jung A.

AU - Yoon, Ho-Kyoung

AU - Lee, Heon-Jeong

AU - Hahn, Sang Woo

AU - Lee, Bun Hee

AU - Jung, Han Yong

PY - 2013/11/1

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N2 - Objectives Neurotrophic factors exert substantial effects on the central nervous system. The present study investigates the roles of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder. Methods Baseline levels of culture-stimulated IGF-1, β-NGF, and BDNF were compared in 116 patients with bipolar I disorder and 123 healthy controls. Neurotrophic factors were also compared in patients before and after 6 weeks of pharmacotherapy. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the influence of the neurotrophic factors analyzed in quartile form, in relation to confounding variables, such as age, sex, and body mass index. Results IGF-1 was significantly higher in patients (mean=514.57, SD=259.78) than in healthy controls (mean=316.82, SD=270.00, p<0.0001) at baseline. Furthermore, higher levels of IGF-1 substantially increased the risk for bipolar I disorder. IGF-1 level was not significantly changed at 6-weeks (mean=506.41, SD=313.66). No changes in BDNF or β-NGF-1 levels were found following the 6-week treatment period. IGF-1 and β-NGF were negatively correlated in healthy controls, but not in patients. Severity of manic symptoms was not associated with any of the neurotrophic factors. Limitations We did not measure cortisol, growth hormone, or IGF-1 receptors. This study is cross-sectional in design. Conclusions Elevated IGF-1 levels may be a trait marker for bipolar disorder. Further studies are needed to thoroughly investigate the role of IGF-1 in relation to other neuroendocrine factors and biological markers for bipolar disorder.

AB - Objectives Neurotrophic factors exert substantial effects on the central nervous system. The present study investigates the roles of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder. Methods Baseline levels of culture-stimulated IGF-1, β-NGF, and BDNF were compared in 116 patients with bipolar I disorder and 123 healthy controls. Neurotrophic factors were also compared in patients before and after 6 weeks of pharmacotherapy. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the influence of the neurotrophic factors analyzed in quartile form, in relation to confounding variables, such as age, sex, and body mass index. Results IGF-1 was significantly higher in patients (mean=514.57, SD=259.78) than in healthy controls (mean=316.82, SD=270.00, p<0.0001) at baseline. Furthermore, higher levels of IGF-1 substantially increased the risk for bipolar I disorder. IGF-1 level was not significantly changed at 6-weeks (mean=506.41, SD=313.66). No changes in BDNF or β-NGF-1 levels were found following the 6-week treatment period. IGF-1 and β-NGF were negatively correlated in healthy controls, but not in patients. Severity of manic symptoms was not associated with any of the neurotrophic factors. Limitations We did not measure cortisol, growth hormone, or IGF-1 receptors. This study is cross-sectional in design. Conclusions Elevated IGF-1 levels may be a trait marker for bipolar disorder. Further studies are needed to thoroughly investigate the role of IGF-1 in relation to other neuroendocrine factors and biological markers for bipolar disorder.

KW - Bipolar disorder

KW - Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

KW - Insulin-like growth factor-1

KW - Nerve growth factor

KW - Neurotrophin

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