Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking

Thomas P. Beresford, David B. Arciniegas, Julie Alfers, Lori Clapp, Brandon Martin, Yiping Du, Dengfeng Liu, Dinggang Shen, Christos Davatzikos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: No clear consensus exists regarding the effect of sustained, heavy drinking on hippocampal volume. Our prior work hypothesized significantly lowered total hippocampus volumes in heavy chronically drinking alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects compared with light-drinking nondependent control subjects matched for age and gender. Method: Using a series of applicable exclusion criteria culled from previous published studies, we measured hippocampal volumes from MRI scan data acquired on a 3T scanner and subjected those data to automated volume analysis blind to the drinking history. Results: Comparison with AD test (n=8) and non-AD control (n=8) subjects found significant lessening in total (p=0.020) and left (p=0.010) hippocampal volumes with a near-significant difference on the right (p=0.051). Linear regression demonstrated that neither total brain volume nor intracranial volume affected the hippocampus measures. Conclusions: These data support the view that heavy drinking exerts a unique and selectively injurious effect on the hippocampus. Further study in larger samples must verify this in a search for possible mechanisms of injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1866-1870
Number of pages5
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drinking
Hippocampus
Alcohols
Linear regression
Brain
History
Alcohol Drinking
Linear Models
Consensus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Light
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Alcohol Drinking
  • Hippocampus
  • MRI Scan
  • Volume Loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Beresford, T. P., Arciniegas, D. B., Alfers, J., Clapp, L., Martin, B., Du, Y., ... Davatzikos, C. (2006). Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 30(11), 1866-1870. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x

Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking. / Beresford, Thomas P.; Arciniegas, David B.; Alfers, Julie; Clapp, Lori; Martin, Brandon; Du, Yiping; Liu, Dengfeng; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 30, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 1866-1870.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beresford, TP, Arciniegas, DB, Alfers, J, Clapp, L, Martin, B, Du, Y, Liu, D, Shen, D & Davatzikos, C 2006, 'Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 1866-1870. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x
Beresford TP, Arciniegas DB, Alfers J, Clapp L, Martin B, Du Y et al. Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2006 Nov 1;30(11):1866-1870. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x
Beresford, Thomas P. ; Arciniegas, David B. ; Alfers, Julie ; Clapp, Lori ; Martin, Brandon ; Du, Yiping ; Liu, Dengfeng ; Shen, Dinggang ; Davatzikos, Christos. / Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 11. pp. 1866-1870.
@article{f39673add60f407bae306dae8d15c56f,
title = "Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking",
abstract = "Objective: No clear consensus exists regarding the effect of sustained, heavy drinking on hippocampal volume. Our prior work hypothesized significantly lowered total hippocampus volumes in heavy chronically drinking alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects compared with light-drinking nondependent control subjects matched for age and gender. Method: Using a series of applicable exclusion criteria culled from previous published studies, we measured hippocampal volumes from MRI scan data acquired on a 3T scanner and subjected those data to automated volume analysis blind to the drinking history. Results: Comparison with AD test (n=8) and non-AD control (n=8) subjects found significant lessening in total (p=0.020) and left (p=0.010) hippocampal volumes with a near-significant difference on the right (p=0.051). Linear regression demonstrated that neither total brain volume nor intracranial volume affected the hippocampus measures. Conclusions: These data support the view that heavy drinking exerts a unique and selectively injurious effect on the hippocampus. Further study in larger samples must verify this in a search for possible mechanisms of injury.",
keywords = "Alcohol Drinking, Hippocampus, MRI Scan, Volume Loss",
author = "Beresford, {Thomas P.} and Arciniegas, {David B.} and Julie Alfers and Lori Clapp and Brandon Martin and Yiping Du and Dengfeng Liu and Dinggang Shen and Christos Davatzikos",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1866--1870",
journal = "Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research",
issn = "0145-6008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hippocampus volume loss due to chronic heavy drinking

AU - Beresford, Thomas P.

AU - Arciniegas, David B.

AU - Alfers, Julie

AU - Clapp, Lori

AU - Martin, Brandon

AU - Du, Yiping

AU - Liu, Dengfeng

AU - Shen, Dinggang

AU - Davatzikos, Christos

PY - 2006/11/1

Y1 - 2006/11/1

N2 - Objective: No clear consensus exists regarding the effect of sustained, heavy drinking on hippocampal volume. Our prior work hypothesized significantly lowered total hippocampus volumes in heavy chronically drinking alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects compared with light-drinking nondependent control subjects matched for age and gender. Method: Using a series of applicable exclusion criteria culled from previous published studies, we measured hippocampal volumes from MRI scan data acquired on a 3T scanner and subjected those data to automated volume analysis blind to the drinking history. Results: Comparison with AD test (n=8) and non-AD control (n=8) subjects found significant lessening in total (p=0.020) and left (p=0.010) hippocampal volumes with a near-significant difference on the right (p=0.051). Linear regression demonstrated that neither total brain volume nor intracranial volume affected the hippocampus measures. Conclusions: These data support the view that heavy drinking exerts a unique and selectively injurious effect on the hippocampus. Further study in larger samples must verify this in a search for possible mechanisms of injury.

AB - Objective: No clear consensus exists regarding the effect of sustained, heavy drinking on hippocampal volume. Our prior work hypothesized significantly lowered total hippocampus volumes in heavy chronically drinking alcohol-dependent (AD) subjects compared with light-drinking nondependent control subjects matched for age and gender. Method: Using a series of applicable exclusion criteria culled from previous published studies, we measured hippocampal volumes from MRI scan data acquired on a 3T scanner and subjected those data to automated volume analysis blind to the drinking history. Results: Comparison with AD test (n=8) and non-AD control (n=8) subjects found significant lessening in total (p=0.020) and left (p=0.010) hippocampal volumes with a near-significant difference on the right (p=0.051). Linear regression demonstrated that neither total brain volume nor intracranial volume affected the hippocampus measures. Conclusions: These data support the view that heavy drinking exerts a unique and selectively injurious effect on the hippocampus. Further study in larger samples must verify this in a search for possible mechanisms of injury.

KW - Alcohol Drinking

KW - Hippocampus

KW - MRI Scan

KW - Volume Loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750337766&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750337766&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00223.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 17067350

AN - SCOPUS:33750337766

VL - 30

SP - 1866

EP - 1870

JO - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

JF - Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

SN - 0145-6008

IS - 11

ER -