Human capital accumulation in emerging Asia, 1970-2030

Jong-Wha Lee, Ruth Francisco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emerging Asian economies have made strong progress in improving educational capital in the past 40 years. High educational attainment, especially at the secondary level, has significantly improved emerging Asia's educational achievement. Regressions show that better parental education and income, lower income inequality, declining fertility, and higher public educational expenditures account for higher educational enrollment. But Asia's average years of schooling are forecast to increase to 7.6 years by 2030, from 7.0 in 2010, significantly slower than the increase of 4.1 years from 1970 to 2010. That would put emerging Asia's educational capital in 2030 at only the 1970 level of the advanced countries, or still 3.5 years behind the level of advanced countries in 2010. For sustained human development, Asian economies must invest in improving educational quality and raising enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-34
Number of pages34
JournalADB Economics Working Paper Series
Volume216
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

capital accumulation
human capital
income
education
educational attainment
economy
expenditure
fertility
expenditures
low income
regression
Asia
Education
Emerging Asia
Human capital accumulation
Enrollment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Human capital accumulation in emerging Asia, 1970-2030. / Lee, Jong-Wha; Francisco, Ruth.

In: ADB Economics Working Paper Series, Vol. 216, 01.09.2010, p. 1-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e2649f5b49664c6cadf467f006e93d75,
title = "Human capital accumulation in emerging Asia, 1970-2030",
abstract = "Emerging Asian economies have made strong progress in improving educational capital in the past 40 years. High educational attainment, especially at the secondary level, has significantly improved emerging Asia's educational achievement. Regressions show that better parental education and income, lower income inequality, declining fertility, and higher public educational expenditures account for higher educational enrollment. But Asia's average years of schooling are forecast to increase to 7.6 years by 2030, from 7.0 in 2010, significantly slower than the increase of 4.1 years from 1970 to 2010. That would put emerging Asia's educational capital in 2030 at only the 1970 level of the advanced countries, or still 3.5 years behind the level of advanced countries in 2010. For sustained human development, Asian economies must invest in improving educational quality and raising enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels.",
author = "Jong-Wha Lee and Ruth Francisco",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "216",
pages = "1--34",
journal = "ERD Working Paper Series",
issn = "1655-5252",
publisher = "Asian Development Bank",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human capital accumulation in emerging Asia, 1970-2030

AU - Lee, Jong-Wha

AU - Francisco, Ruth

PY - 2010/9/1

Y1 - 2010/9/1

N2 - Emerging Asian economies have made strong progress in improving educational capital in the past 40 years. High educational attainment, especially at the secondary level, has significantly improved emerging Asia's educational achievement. Regressions show that better parental education and income, lower income inequality, declining fertility, and higher public educational expenditures account for higher educational enrollment. But Asia's average years of schooling are forecast to increase to 7.6 years by 2030, from 7.0 in 2010, significantly slower than the increase of 4.1 years from 1970 to 2010. That would put emerging Asia's educational capital in 2030 at only the 1970 level of the advanced countries, or still 3.5 years behind the level of advanced countries in 2010. For sustained human development, Asian economies must invest in improving educational quality and raising enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels.

AB - Emerging Asian economies have made strong progress in improving educational capital in the past 40 years. High educational attainment, especially at the secondary level, has significantly improved emerging Asia's educational achievement. Regressions show that better parental education and income, lower income inequality, declining fertility, and higher public educational expenditures account for higher educational enrollment. But Asia's average years of schooling are forecast to increase to 7.6 years by 2030, from 7.0 in 2010, significantly slower than the increase of 4.1 years from 1970 to 2010. That would put emerging Asia's educational capital in 2030 at only the 1970 level of the advanced countries, or still 3.5 years behind the level of advanced countries in 2010. For sustained human development, Asian economies must invest in improving educational quality and raising enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79551608659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79551608659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:79551608659

VL - 216

SP - 1

EP - 34

JO - ERD Working Paper Series

JF - ERD Working Paper Series

SN - 1655-5252

ER -