Identification of influenza C virus in young South Korean children, from October 2013 to September 2016

Han Sol Lee, Sooyeon Lim, Ji Yun Noh, Joon-Young Song, Hee-Jin Cheong, Jung Hwa Lee, Sung Il Woo, Woo Joo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Influenza C virus has been largely neglected, compared to influenza A orB viruses, and is not routinely tested in clinical practices. However, several studies have indicated that influenza C virus causes severe acute respiratory illness and pneumonia in all ages. Objective: We conducted a study to identify influenza C virus among young children in South Korea.Study design. From October 2013 to September 2016, 973 young children with influenzalike illness (ILI) were enrolled at three university hospitals. We tested nasopharyngeal samples for 16 types of respiratory viruses. Among the tested samples, 564 were positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Except for the samples where 16 types of respiratory viruses were found, 409 negative samples were examined for the presence of influenza C virus, using a matrix gene specific primer set. Results: Among 409 nasopharyngeal samples, five influenza C viruses were detected. The manifestation of influenza C virus infection in young children was observed acute respiratory illness, such as fever, rhinorrhea, and cough, but no pneumonia or severe respiratory illness. Nucleotide sequencing was conducted and a phylogenetic tree was generated. We found that C/Sao Paulo/387/82-like lineage viruses circulated in South Korea, and the fully sequenced virus (C/Seoul/APD462/2015) was closely related to C/Victoria/2/2012 and C/Tokyo/4/2014 strains. Conclusions: This study was the first report of influenza C virus detection in South Korea. Although severe illness was not observed in this study, we suggest the necessity for influenza C virus testing in pediatric patients with ILI, considering other reports of severe illnesses caused by influenza C virus infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume115
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun 1

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Influenzavirus C
Republic of Korea
Viruses
Virus Diseases
Seoul virus
Pneumonia
Tokyo
Victoria
Influenza A virus
Cough
Fever
Nucleotides

Keywords

  • Influenza C virus
  • Phylogenetic analysis
  • South Korea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Identification of influenza C virus in young South Korean children, from October 2013 to September 2016",
abstract = "Background: Influenza C virus has been largely neglected, compared to influenza A orB viruses, and is not routinely tested in clinical practices. However, several studies have indicated that influenza C virus causes severe acute respiratory illness and pneumonia in all ages. Objective: We conducted a study to identify influenza C virus among young children in South Korea.Study design. From October 2013 to September 2016, 973 young children with influenzalike illness (ILI) were enrolled at three university hospitals. We tested nasopharyngeal samples for 16 types of respiratory viruses. Among the tested samples, 564 were positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Except for the samples where 16 types of respiratory viruses were found, 409 negative samples were examined for the presence of influenza C virus, using a matrix gene specific primer set. Results: Among 409 nasopharyngeal samples, five influenza C viruses were detected. The manifestation of influenza C virus infection in young children was observed acute respiratory illness, such as fever, rhinorrhea, and cough, but no pneumonia or severe respiratory illness. Nucleotide sequencing was conducted and a phylogenetic tree was generated. We found that C/Sao Paulo/387/82-like lineage viruses circulated in South Korea, and the fully sequenced virus (C/Seoul/APD462/2015) was closely related to C/Victoria/2/2012 and C/Tokyo/4/2014 strains. Conclusions: This study was the first report of influenza C virus detection in South Korea. Although severe illness was not observed in this study, we suggest the necessity for influenza C virus testing in pediatric patients with ILI, considering other reports of severe illnesses caused by influenza C virus infections.",
keywords = "Influenza C virus, Phylogenetic analysis, South Korea",
author = "Lee, {Han Sol} and Sooyeon Lim and Noh, {Ji Yun} and Joon-Young Song and Hee-Jin Cheong and Lee, {Jung Hwa} and Woo, {Sung Il} and Kim, {Woo Joo}",
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T1 - Identification of influenza C virus in young South Korean children, from October 2013 to September 2016

AU - Lee, Han Sol

AU - Lim, Sooyeon

AU - Noh, Ji Yun

AU - Song, Joon-Young

AU - Cheong, Hee-Jin

AU - Lee, Jung Hwa

AU - Woo, Sung Il

AU - Kim, Woo Joo

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Background: Influenza C virus has been largely neglected, compared to influenza A orB viruses, and is not routinely tested in clinical practices. However, several studies have indicated that influenza C virus causes severe acute respiratory illness and pneumonia in all ages. Objective: We conducted a study to identify influenza C virus among young children in South Korea.Study design. From October 2013 to September 2016, 973 young children with influenzalike illness (ILI) were enrolled at three university hospitals. We tested nasopharyngeal samples for 16 types of respiratory viruses. Among the tested samples, 564 were positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Except for the samples where 16 types of respiratory viruses were found, 409 negative samples were examined for the presence of influenza C virus, using a matrix gene specific primer set. Results: Among 409 nasopharyngeal samples, five influenza C viruses were detected. The manifestation of influenza C virus infection in young children was observed acute respiratory illness, such as fever, rhinorrhea, and cough, but no pneumonia or severe respiratory illness. Nucleotide sequencing was conducted and a phylogenetic tree was generated. We found that C/Sao Paulo/387/82-like lineage viruses circulated in South Korea, and the fully sequenced virus (C/Seoul/APD462/2015) was closely related to C/Victoria/2/2012 and C/Tokyo/4/2014 strains. Conclusions: This study was the first report of influenza C virus detection in South Korea. Although severe illness was not observed in this study, we suggest the necessity for influenza C virus testing in pediatric patients with ILI, considering other reports of severe illnesses caused by influenza C virus infections.

AB - Background: Influenza C virus has been largely neglected, compared to influenza A orB viruses, and is not routinely tested in clinical practices. However, several studies have indicated that influenza C virus causes severe acute respiratory illness and pneumonia in all ages. Objective: We conducted a study to identify influenza C virus among young children in South Korea.Study design. From October 2013 to September 2016, 973 young children with influenzalike illness (ILI) were enrolled at three university hospitals. We tested nasopharyngeal samples for 16 types of respiratory viruses. Among the tested samples, 564 were positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Except for the samples where 16 types of respiratory viruses were found, 409 negative samples were examined for the presence of influenza C virus, using a matrix gene specific primer set. Results: Among 409 nasopharyngeal samples, five influenza C viruses were detected. The manifestation of influenza C virus infection in young children was observed acute respiratory illness, such as fever, rhinorrhea, and cough, but no pneumonia or severe respiratory illness. Nucleotide sequencing was conducted and a phylogenetic tree was generated. We found that C/Sao Paulo/387/82-like lineage viruses circulated in South Korea, and the fully sequenced virus (C/Seoul/APD462/2015) was closely related to C/Victoria/2/2012 and C/Tokyo/4/2014 strains. Conclusions: This study was the first report of influenza C virus detection in South Korea. Although severe illness was not observed in this study, we suggest the necessity for influenza C virus testing in pediatric patients with ILI, considering other reports of severe illnesses caused by influenza C virus infections.

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