Immediate therapeutic effect of interferential current therapy on spasticity, balance, and gait function in chronic stroke patients

A randomized control trial

Hye Rim Suh, Hee Chul Han, Hwi Young Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether a single trial of interferential current therapy (ICT) can immediately alleviate spasticity and improve balance and gait performance in patients with chronic stroke. Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation in a local center. Subjects: A total of 42 adult patients with chronic stroke with plantar flexor spasticity of the lower limb. Intervention: The ICT group received a single 60-minute ICT stimulation of the gastrocnemius in conjunction with air-pump massage. In the placebo-ICT group, electrodes were placed and air-pump massage performed without electrical stimulation. Main measures: After a single ICT application, spasticity was measured immediately using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and balance and functional gait performance were assessed using the following clinical tools: Functional Reach Test (FRT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and 10-m Walk Test (10MWT). Results: Gastrocnemius spasticity significantly decreased in the ICT group than in the placebo-ICT group (MAS: ICT vs placebo-ICT: 1.55±0.76 vs 0.40±0.50). The ICT group showed significantly greater improvement in balance and gait abilities than the placebo-ICT group (FRT: 2.62±1.21 vs 0.61±1.34, BBS: 1.75±1.52 vs 0.40±0.88, TUG: 6.07±6.11 vs 1.68±2.39, 10MWT: 7.02±7.02 vs 1.96±3.13). Spasticity correlated significantly with balance and gait abilities (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A single trial of ICT is a useful intervention for immediately improving spasticity, balance, and gait abilities in chronic stroke patients, but not for long-term effects. Further study on the effects of repeated ICT is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-891
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Therapeutic Uses
Gait
Group Psychotherapy
Stroke
Placebos
Aptitude
Massage
Therapeutics
Air
Electric Stimulation
Inpatients
Lower Extremity
Electrodes
Rehabilitation
Randomized Controlled Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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title = "Immediate therapeutic effect of interferential current therapy on spasticity, balance, and gait function in chronic stroke patients: A randomized control trial",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether a single trial of interferential current therapy (ICT) can immediately alleviate spasticity and improve balance and gait performance in patients with chronic stroke. Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation in a local center. Subjects: A total of 42 adult patients with chronic stroke with plantar flexor spasticity of the lower limb. Intervention: The ICT group received a single 60-minute ICT stimulation of the gastrocnemius in conjunction with air-pump massage. In the placebo-ICT group, electrodes were placed and air-pump massage performed without electrical stimulation. Main measures: After a single ICT application, spasticity was measured immediately using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and balance and functional gait performance were assessed using the following clinical tools: Functional Reach Test (FRT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and 10-m Walk Test (10MWT). Results: Gastrocnemius spasticity significantly decreased in the ICT group than in the placebo-ICT group (MAS: ICT vs placebo-ICT: 1.55±0.76 vs 0.40±0.50). The ICT group showed significantly greater improvement in balance and gait abilities than the placebo-ICT group (FRT: 2.62±1.21 vs 0.61±1.34, BBS: 1.75±1.52 vs 0.40±0.88, TUG: 6.07±6.11 vs 1.68±2.39, 10MWT: 7.02±7.02 vs 1.96±3.13). Spasticity correlated significantly with balance and gait abilities (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A single trial of ICT is a useful intervention for immediately improving spasticity, balance, and gait abilities in chronic stroke patients, but not for long-term effects. Further study on the effects of repeated ICT is needed.",
keywords = "balance, gait, interferential current therapy (ICT), spasticity, Stroke",
author = "Suh, {Hye Rim} and Han, {Hee Chul} and Cho, {Hwi Young}",
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AU - Suh, Hye Rim

AU - Han, Hee Chul

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N2 - Objective: To determine whether a single trial of interferential current therapy (ICT) can immediately alleviate spasticity and improve balance and gait performance in patients with chronic stroke. Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation in a local center. Subjects: A total of 42 adult patients with chronic stroke with plantar flexor spasticity of the lower limb. Intervention: The ICT group received a single 60-minute ICT stimulation of the gastrocnemius in conjunction with air-pump massage. In the placebo-ICT group, electrodes were placed and air-pump massage performed without electrical stimulation. Main measures: After a single ICT application, spasticity was measured immediately using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and balance and functional gait performance were assessed using the following clinical tools: Functional Reach Test (FRT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and 10-m Walk Test (10MWT). Results: Gastrocnemius spasticity significantly decreased in the ICT group than in the placebo-ICT group (MAS: ICT vs placebo-ICT: 1.55±0.76 vs 0.40±0.50). The ICT group showed significantly greater improvement in balance and gait abilities than the placebo-ICT group (FRT: 2.62±1.21 vs 0.61±1.34, BBS: 1.75±1.52 vs 0.40±0.88, TUG: 6.07±6.11 vs 1.68±2.39, 10MWT: 7.02±7.02 vs 1.96±3.13). Spasticity correlated significantly with balance and gait abilities (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A single trial of ICT is a useful intervention for immediately improving spasticity, balance, and gait abilities in chronic stroke patients, but not for long-term effects. Further study on the effects of repeated ICT is needed.

AB - Objective: To determine whether a single trial of interferential current therapy (ICT) can immediately alleviate spasticity and improve balance and gait performance in patients with chronic stroke. Design: Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation in a local center. Subjects: A total of 42 adult patients with chronic stroke with plantar flexor spasticity of the lower limb. Intervention: The ICT group received a single 60-minute ICT stimulation of the gastrocnemius in conjunction with air-pump massage. In the placebo-ICT group, electrodes were placed and air-pump massage performed without electrical stimulation. Main measures: After a single ICT application, spasticity was measured immediately using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and balance and functional gait performance were assessed using the following clinical tools: Functional Reach Test (FRT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and 10-m Walk Test (10MWT). Results: Gastrocnemius spasticity significantly decreased in the ICT group than in the placebo-ICT group (MAS: ICT vs placebo-ICT: 1.55±0.76 vs 0.40±0.50). The ICT group showed significantly greater improvement in balance and gait abilities than the placebo-ICT group (FRT: 2.62±1.21 vs 0.61±1.34, BBS: 1.75±1.52 vs 0.40±0.88, TUG: 6.07±6.11 vs 1.68±2.39, 10MWT: 7.02±7.02 vs 1.96±3.13). Spasticity correlated significantly with balance and gait abilities (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A single trial of ICT is a useful intervention for immediately improving spasticity, balance, and gait abilities in chronic stroke patients, but not for long-term effects. Further study on the effects of repeated ICT is needed.

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