Impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on phytoplankton productivity in the South China Sea

Tae-Wook Kim, Kitack Lee, Robert Duce, Peter Liss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition on the marine N cycle are only now being revealed, but the magnitudes of those impacts are largely unknown in time and space. The South China Sea (SCS) is particularly subject to high anthropogenic N deposition, because the adjacent countries are highly populated and have rapidly growing economies. Analysis of data sets for atmospheric N deposition, satellite chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and air mass back trajectories reveals that the transport of N originating from the populated east coasts of China and Indonesia, and its deposition to the ocean, has been responsible for the enhancements of Chl-a in the SCS. We found that atmospheric N deposition contributed approximately 20% of the annual biological new production in the SCS. The airborne contribution of N to new production in the SCS is expected to grow considerably in the coming decades. Key Points N deposition contributed ~20% of the new production in the South China Sea Air masses from highly populated regions increased the Chl-a concentration

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3156-3162
Number of pages7
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 May 16
Externally publishedYes

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phytoplankton
productivity
China
nitrogen
chlorophylls
chlorophyll a
air masses
air mass
Indonesia
economy
coasts
sea
oceans
trajectory
trajectories
cycles
augmentation
coast
ocean

Keywords

  • Atmospheric nitrogen deposition
  • Chlorophyll-a
  • Concentration weighted trajectories
  • Ocean productivity
  • South China Sea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on phytoplankton productivity in the South China Sea. / Kim, Tae-Wook; Lee, Kitack; Duce, Robert; Liss, Peter.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 41, No. 9, 16.05.2014, p. 3156-3162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Tae-Wook ; Lee, Kitack ; Duce, Robert ; Liss, Peter. / Impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on phytoplankton productivity in the South China Sea. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 3156-3162.
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