Impact of drops on solid surfaces

self-similar capillary waves, and splashing as a new type of kinematic discontinuity

Alexander Yarin, D. A. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

546 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of drops impinging one by one on a solid surface was studied experimentally and theoretically. The impact process was observed by means of a charge-coupled-device camera, its pictures processed by a computer. Low-velocity impact resulted in spreading and in propagation of capillary waves, whereas at higher velocities, splashing set in. The splashing threshold was determined as a function of the impact parameters and was found to correspond to the onset of a velocity discontinuity propagating over the liquid layer on the wall. The pattern of the capillary waves was predicted to be self-similar. The onset velocity of splashing and the rate of propagation of the kinematic discontinuity were calculated, and shown to agree well with experimental data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-173
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Fluid Mechanics
Volume283
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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splashing
capillary waves
solid surfaces
discontinuity
Kinematics
kinematics
propagation
CCD cameras
low speed
charge coupled devices
cameras
thresholds
Liquids
liquids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Impact of drops on solid surfaces : self-similar capillary waves, and splashing as a new type of kinematic discontinuity. / Yarin, Alexander; Weiss, D. A.

In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 283, 01.01.1995, p. 141-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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