Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin

Aziz Moqrich, Sun Wook Hwang, Taryn J. Earley, Matt J. Petrus, Amber N. Murray, Kathryn S R Spencer, Mary Andahazy, Gina M. Story, Ardem Patapoutian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Environmental temperature is thought to be directly sensed by neurons through their projections in the skin. A subset of the mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels has been implicated in this process. These "thermoTRPs" are activated at distinct temperature thresholds and are typically expressed, in sensory neurons. TRPV3 is activated by heat (>33°C) and, unlike most thermoTRPs, is expressed in mouse keratinocytes. We found that TRPV3 null mice have strong deficits in responses to innocuous and noxious heat but not in other sensory modalities; hence, TRPV3 has a specific role in thermosensation. The natural compound camphor, which modulates sensations of warmth in humans, proved to be a specific activator of TRPV3. Camphor activated cultured primary keratinocytes but not sensory neurons, and this activity was abolished in TRPV3 null mice. Therefore, heat-activated receptors in keratinocytes are important for mammalian thermosensation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1468-1472
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume307
Issue number5714
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Mar 4
Externally publishedYes

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Camphor
Keratinocytes
Hot Temperature
Sensory Receptor Cells
Skin
Temperature
Ion Channels
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Moqrich, A., Hwang, S. W., Earley, T. J., Petrus, M. J., Murray, A. N., Spencer, K. S. R., ... Patapoutian, A. (2005). Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin. Science, 307(5714), 1468-1472. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1108609

Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin. / Moqrich, Aziz; Hwang, Sun Wook; Earley, Taryn J.; Petrus, Matt J.; Murray, Amber N.; Spencer, Kathryn S R; Andahazy, Mary; Story, Gina M.; Patapoutian, Ardem.

In: Science, Vol. 307, No. 5714, 04.03.2005, p. 1468-1472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moqrich, A, Hwang, SW, Earley, TJ, Petrus, MJ, Murray, AN, Spencer, KSR, Andahazy, M, Story, GM & Patapoutian, A 2005, 'Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin', Science, vol. 307, no. 5714, pp. 1468-1472. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1108609
Moqrich A, Hwang SW, Earley TJ, Petrus MJ, Murray AN, Spencer KSR et al. Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin. Science. 2005 Mar 4;307(5714):1468-1472. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1108609
Moqrich, Aziz ; Hwang, Sun Wook ; Earley, Taryn J. ; Petrus, Matt J. ; Murray, Amber N. ; Spencer, Kathryn S R ; Andahazy, Mary ; Story, Gina M. ; Patapoutian, Ardem. / Impaired thermosensation in mice lacking TRPV3, a heat and camphor sensor in the skin. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 307, No. 5714. pp. 1468-1472.
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