Implications of circadian rhythm in dopamine and mood regulation

Jeongah Kim, Sangwon Jang, Han Kyoung Choe, Sooyoung Chung, Gi Hoon Son, Kyungjin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by an internal time-keeping system, referred to as circadian rhythm. The circadian timing system has a hierarchical organization composed of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and local clocks in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral organs. The circadian clock molecular mechanism involves a network of transcription-translation feedback loops. In addition to the clinical association between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders, recent studies have suggested a molecular link between mood regulation and circadian rhythm. Specifically, genetic deletion of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα induces mania-like behavior caused by increased midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) tone at dusk. The association between circadian rhythm and emotion- related behaviors can be applied to pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), DAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta progressively degenerate leading to motor dysfunction. Patients with PD also exhibit non-motor symptoms, including sleep disorder and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that link the molecular circadian clock and brain machinery in the regulation of emotional behaviors and related midbrain DAergic neuronal circuits in healthy and pathological states. This review summarizes the current literature regarding the association between circadian rhythm and mood regulation from a chronobiological perspective, and may provide insight into therapeutic approaches to target psychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases involving circadian rhythm dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450-456
Number of pages7
JournalMolecules and Cells
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Circadian Rhythm
Dopamine
Circadian Clocks
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Mesencephalon
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Parkinson Disease
Chronobiology Disorders
Dopaminergic Neurons
Brain
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Mood Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Psychiatry
Emotions
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Circadian rhythm
  • Dopaminergic system
  • Mood disorder
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • REV-ERBα

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Implications of circadian rhythm in dopamine and mood regulation. / Kim, Jeongah; Jang, Sangwon; Choe, Han Kyoung; Chung, Sooyoung; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin.

In: Molecules and Cells, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.01.2017, p. 450-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kim, Jeongah ; Jang, Sangwon ; Choe, Han Kyoung ; Chung, Sooyoung ; Son, Gi Hoon ; Kim, Kyungjin. / Implications of circadian rhythm in dopamine and mood regulation. In: Molecules and Cells. 2017 ; Vol. 40, No. 7. pp. 450-456.
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