Improving the efficiency of metal removal from CCA-treated wood using brown rot fungi

Gyu Hyeok Kim, Yong Seok Choi, Jae-Jin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioremediation of CCA-treated wood wastes by brown rot fungi, as well as to improve the metal removal from treated wood by altering an existing bioremediation process. In Process I, CCA-treated wood sawdust was added and bioremediated after accumulating oxalic acid in a fermentation broth. In Process II, simplification of the bioremediation process and improvement of metal removal efficiency were attempted. Thus, the treated sawdust and fungal inocula were simultaneously placed in a fermentation broth. In addition, the efficiency of the fermentation broth containing oxalic acid was compared with that of commercial oxalic acid. The results obtained using Process I showed that the greatest reduction in arsenic and chromium (98% and 91%, respectively) was achieved by an unknown Polyporales species. On the other hand, the most efficient removal of copper (82%) was achieved by Daedalea dickinsii, which had the lowest oxalic acid production. Using Process II, the highest copper, chromium and arsenic removal rates (96%, 92% and 98%, respectively) were obtained by Fomitopsis palustris. Process II could be a very valuable method for metal removal from CCA-treated wood when F. palustris is used. Our results also suggest that oxalic acid produced from fungus can be used as an alternative to commercial oxalic acid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)673-679
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Technology
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Oxalic Acid
oxalic acid
Fungi
Wood
Metals
fungus
Environmental Biodegradation
Bioremediation
metal
bioremediation
Fermentation
fermentation
Sawdust
Arsenic
Chromium
chromium
Polyporales
Copper
arsenic
Coriolaceae

Keywords

  • Bioremediation
  • Brown rot fungi
  • CCA-treated wood
  • Fomitopsis palustris
  • Oxalic acid
  • Polyporales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Improving the efficiency of metal removal from CCA-treated wood using brown rot fungi. / Kim, Gyu Hyeok; Choi, Yong Seok; Kim, Jae-Jin.

In: Environmental Technology, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.06.2009, p. 673-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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