In vitro investigation of the effects of exogenous sugammadex on coagulation in orthopedic surgical patients

Il Ok Lee, Young Sung Kim, Hae Wone Chang, Heezoo Kim, Byung Gun Lim, Mido Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have shown that sugammadex resulted in the prolongation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vitro effects of exogenous sugammadex on the coagulation variables of whole blood in healthy patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. Methods: The effects of sugammadex on coagulations were assessed using thromboelastography (TEG) in kaolin-activated citrated blood samples taken from 14 healthy patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. The in vitro effects of three different concentrations of sugammadex (42, 193, and 301 μg mL-1) on the TEG profiles were compared with those of the control (0 μg mL-1). Previous studies indicated that these exogenous concentrations correspond to the approximate maximum plasma concentrations achieved after the administration of 4, 16, and 32 mg kg-1 sugammadex to healthy subjects. Results: Increased sugammadex concentrations were significantly associated with reduced coagulation, as evidenced by increases in reaction time (r), coagulation time, and time to maximum rate of thrombus generation (TMRTG), and decreases in the angle, maximum amplitude, and maximum rate of thrombus generation. Compared with the control, the median percentage change (interquartile range) in the TEG values of the samples treated with the highest exogenous sugammadex concentration was the greatest for r, 53% (26, 67.3%), and TMRTG, 48% (26, 59%). Conclusions: This in vitro study suggests that supratherapeutic doses of exogenous sugammadex might be associated with moderate hypocoagulation in the whole blood of healthy subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number56
JournalBMC Anesthesiology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 24

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Orthopedics
Thrombelastography
Thrombosis
Healthy Volunteers
Kaolin
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Sugammadex
In Vitro Techniques
Prothrombin Time

Keywords

  • Blood coagulation
  • Sugammadex
  • Thromboelastography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

In vitro investigation of the effects of exogenous sugammadex on coagulation in orthopedic surgical patients. / Lee, Il Ok; Kim, Young Sung; Chang, Hae Wone; Kim, Heezoo; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, Mido.

In: BMC Anesthesiology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 56, 24.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, Mido

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