In-vivo NFC: Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy

Byungjo Kim, Jiung Yu, Hyogon Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Near field communication (NFC) technology can be a desirable technology for implantable medical devices (IMDs) owing to its communication range short enough for privacy and long enough for most IMD insertion locations. Today's smart phones already have NFC capability and they can enable remote monitoring and configuration by doctors and monitoring stations through 3G/4G connections. Although it can be implemented today, more careful study is needed in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), achievable data rate, and security, for actual use on the IMDs. 5 Acknowledgments.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems
Pages327-328
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1
Event10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: 2012 Nov 62012 Nov 9

Other

Other10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period12/11/612/11/9

Fingerprint

Monitoring
Communication
Near field communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Kim, B., Yu, J., & Kim, H. (2012). In-vivo NFC: Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy. In SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (pp. 327-328) https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426691

In-vivo NFC : Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy. / Kim, Byungjo; Yu, Jiung; Kim, Hyogon.

SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. p. 327-328.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, B, Yu, J & Kim, H 2012, In-vivo NFC: Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy. in SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. pp. 327-328, 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012, Toronto, ON, Canada, 12/11/6. https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426691
Kim B, Yu J, Kim H. In-vivo NFC: Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy. In SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. p. 327-328 https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426691
Kim, Byungjo ; Yu, Jiung ; Kim, Hyogon. / In-vivo NFC : Remote monitoring of implanted medical devices with improved privacy. SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. pp. 327-328
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