In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function

Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands

Jeffrey J. Wine, Jessica E. Char, Jonathan Chen, Hyung ju Cho, Colleen Dunn, Eric Frisbee, Nam Soo Joo, Carlos Milla, Sara E. Modlin, Il Ho Park, Ewart A.C. Thomas, Kim V. Tran, Rohan Verma, Marlene H. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (∼50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ∼0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with 'CFTR-related' conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere77114
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 24
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sweat glands
sweat
Sweat Glands
Sweat
secretion
Bioassay
Muscarinic Receptors
Assays
Methacholine Chloride
sweating
Sweating
bubbles
Adrenergic Agents
Heterozygote
Biological Assay
Oils
Coloring Agents
heterozygosity
bioassays
Calcium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function : Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands. / Wine, Jeffrey J.; Char, Jessica E.; Chen, Jonathan; Cho, Hyung ju; Dunn, Colleen; Frisbee, Eric; Joo, Nam Soo; Milla, Carlos; Modlin, Sara E.; Park, Il Ho; Thomas, Ewart A.C.; Tran, Kim V.; Verma, Rohan; Wolfe, Marlene H.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 10, e77114, 24.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wine, JJ, Char, JE, Chen, J, Cho, HJ, Dunn, C, Frisbee, E, Joo, NS, Milla, C, Modlin, SE, Park, IH, Thomas, EAC, Tran, KV, Verma, R & Wolfe, MH 2013, 'In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 10, e77114. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077114
Wine, Jeffrey J. ; Char, Jessica E. ; Chen, Jonathan ; Cho, Hyung ju ; Dunn, Colleen ; Frisbee, Eric ; Joo, Nam Soo ; Milla, Carlos ; Modlin, Sara E. ; Park, Il Ho ; Thomas, Ewart A.C. ; Tran, Kim V. ; Verma, Rohan ; Wolfe, Marlene H. / In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function : Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 10.
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