Incidence and short-term mortality from perforated peptic ulcer in Korea

A population-based study

Seung Jin Bae, Ki Nam Shim, Nayoung Kim, Jung Mook Kang, Dong Sook Kim, Kyoung Min Kim, Yu Kyung Cho, Sung Woo Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is associated with serious health and economic outcomes. However,few studies have estimated the incidence and health outcomes of PPU using a nationally representative sample in Asia. We estimated age- and sex-specific incidence and short-term mortality from PPU among Koreans and investigated the risk factors for mortality associated with PPU development. Methods: A retrospective population-based study was conducted from 2006 through 2007 using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. A diagnostic algorithm was derived and validated to identify PPU patients, and PPU incidence rates and 30-daymortality rates were determined. Results: From 2006 through 2007, the PPU incidence rate per 100 000 population was 4.4; incidence among men (7.53) was approximately 6 times that among women (1.24). Incidence significantly increased with advanced age,especially among women older than 50 years. Among 4258 PPU patients, 135 (3.15%)died within 30 days of the PPU event. The 30-day mortality rate increased with advanced age and reached almost 20% for patients older than 80 years. The 30-day mortality rate was 10% for women and 2% for men. Older age, being female, and higher comorbidity were independently associated with 30-day mortality rate among PPU patients in Korea. Conclusions: Special attention should be paid to elderly women with high comorbidity who develop PPU.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)508-516
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Nov 19

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Korea
Peptic Ulcer
Mortality
Incidence
Population
Comorbidity
Health
National Health Programs
Economics
Databases

Keywords

  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • Peptic ulcer perforation
  • Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Incidence and short-term mortality from perforated peptic ulcer in Korea : A population-based study. / Bae, Seung Jin; Shim, Ki Nam; Kim, Nayoung; Kang, Jung Mook; Kim, Dong Sook; Kim, Kyoung Min; Cho, Yu Kyung; Jung, Sung Woo.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 19.11.2012, p. 508-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bae, Seung Jin ; Shim, Ki Nam ; Kim, Nayoung ; Kang, Jung Mook ; Kim, Dong Sook ; Kim, Kyoung Min ; Cho, Yu Kyung ; Jung, Sung Woo. / Incidence and short-term mortality from perforated peptic ulcer in Korea : A population-based study. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 508-516.
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