Increased adipose tissue hypoxia and capacity for angiogenesis and inflammation in young diet-sensitive C57 mice compared with diet-resistant FVB mice

Dong-Hun Kim, R. Gutierrez-Aguilar, H. J. Kim, S. C. Woods, R. J. Seeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:High-fat diets (HFDs) result in increased body weight. However, this is not uniform and determining the factors that make some animals or individual more susceptible to this diet-induced weight gain is a critical research question. The expansion of white adipose tissue (WAT) associated with weight gain requires high rates of angiogenesis to support the expanding tissue mass. We hypothesized that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice have a greater capacity for WAT angiogenesis and remodeling than diet-resistant (DR) mice at a young age, before age or DIO.Design:We measured body weight and body composition by nuclear magnetic resonance. We compared the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, angiogenesis and inflammation by real-time, quantitative PCR and PCR arrays. WAT morphology and distribution of adipocyte size were analyzed. The level of hypoxia and vascular density was assessed by immunohistochemistry in WAT of young mice.Results:C57Bl/6 mice were DIO and FVB/N (FVB) mice DR after 8 weeks on a low-fat diet or HFD. However, C57Bl/6 mice had lower body weight, lower adiposity, smaller adipocytes and decreased leptin and lipogenic genes expression in adipose tissue than FVB mice at 9 weeks of age on a chow diet. Despite having smaller adipocytes, the level of hypoxia and the expression of pro-angiogenesis genes were higher in WAT of young C57Bl/6 mice than young FVB mice. In addition, expression of genes related to macrophages and their recruitment, and to proinflammatory cytokines, was significantly higher in WAT of young C57Bl/6 mice than young FVB mice.Conclusion:These data suggest that the potential for WAT remodeling in early period of growth is higher in C57Bl/6 mice as compared with FVB mice, and we hypothesize that it may contribute to the increased susceptibility to DIO of C57Bl/6 mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)853-860
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun 1

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Adipose Tissue
Diet
Inflammation
White Adipose Tissue
Adipocytes
Body Weight
High Fat Diet
Gene Expression
Hypoxia
Weight Gain
Obese Mice
Fat-Restricted Diet
Adiposity
Tissue Distribution
Leptin
Body Composition
Lipid Metabolism
Blood Vessels
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • adipose tissue
  • angiogenesis
  • diet-induced/resistant obesity
  • high-fat diet
  • hypoxia
  • inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Increased adipose tissue hypoxia and capacity for angiogenesis and inflammation in young diet-sensitive C57 mice compared with diet-resistant FVB mice. / Kim, Dong-Hun; Gutierrez-Aguilar, R.; Kim, H. J.; Woods, S. C.; Seeley, R. J.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 853-860.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, H. J.

AU - Woods, S. C.

AU - Seeley, R. J.

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KW - diet-induced/resistant obesity

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KW - hypoxia

KW - inflammation

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