Increased Serum Ion Levels After Ceramic-on-Metal Bearing Total Hip Arthroplasty: Influence of an Asian Lifestyle

Seung Beom Han, Jong-Keon Oh, Woo Young Jang, Nishant Choudhary, Hyun Gon Kim, Won Yong Shon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent clinical studies have suggested that systemic metal ion levels are significantly elevated at midterm follow-up in patients with ceramic-on-metal (COM) bearing. However, it is not clear whether there is a correlation between patient-related factors including the lifestyle and elevated levels of serum metal ions following COM total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods: Serum metal levels were measured in 201 patients (234 hips) including 121 COM patients (140 hips) and 80 non-COM patients (94 hips). The Harris Hip Score, University of California, Los Angeles activity scale score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were measured and radiographs were obtained for the analysis. Results: Significantly higher levels of cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) were detected in the serum of the COM THA group (Co: 1.86 ± 4.0 μg/L; Cr: 1.81 ± 2.87 μg/L) than those of the non-COM THA group (Co: 0.27 ± 0.14 μg/L; Cr: 0.19 ± 0.25 μg/L; P < .001).The serum metal levels of patients who achieved the squatting position and the kneeling position were significantly higher than those of patients who could not squat (Co: P = .033; Cr: P = .074) and kneel (Co: P = .049; Cr: P = .031). The metal ion levels of the COM THA group correlated with the total range of motion (Co: P = .0293; Cr: P = .0399). Conclusion: Patients who underwent a 36-mm COM THA showed high serum metal levels although good clinical outcomes at the midterm follow-up. We found that COM THA patients who were capable of greater range of motion, squatting, and kneeling are at risk of metal ion-related problems.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Ceramics
Arthroplasty
Life Style
Hip
Metals
Ions
Serum
Chromium
Cobalt
Articular Range of Motion
Los Angeles
Ontario
Osteoarthritis

Keywords

  • Ceramic
  • Level III
  • Lifestyle
  • Metal
  • Prognostic study
  • Serum ion
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Increased Serum Ion Levels After Ceramic-on-Metal Bearing Total Hip Arthroplasty : Influence of an Asian Lifestyle. / Han, Seung Beom; Oh, Jong-Keon; Jang, Woo Young; Choudhary, Nishant; Kim, Hyun Gon; Shon, Won Yong.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Han, Seung Beom ; Oh, Jong-Keon ; Jang, Woo Young ; Choudhary, Nishant ; Kim, Hyun Gon ; Shon, Won Yong. / Increased Serum Ion Levels After Ceramic-on-Metal Bearing Total Hip Arthroplasty : Influence of an Asian Lifestyle. In: Journal of Arthroplasty. 2017.
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abstract = "Background: Recent clinical studies have suggested that systemic metal ion levels are significantly elevated at midterm follow-up in patients with ceramic-on-metal (COM) bearing. However, it is not clear whether there is a correlation between patient-related factors including the lifestyle and elevated levels of serum metal ions following COM total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods: Serum metal levels were measured in 201 patients (234 hips) including 121 COM patients (140 hips) and 80 non-COM patients (94 hips). The Harris Hip Score, University of California, Los Angeles activity scale score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were measured and radiographs were obtained for the analysis. Results: Significantly higher levels of cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) were detected in the serum of the COM THA group (Co: 1.86 ± 4.0 μg/L; Cr: 1.81 ± 2.87 μg/L) than those of the non-COM THA group (Co: 0.27 ± 0.14 μg/L; Cr: 0.19 ± 0.25 μg/L; P < .001).The serum metal levels of patients who achieved the squatting position and the kneeling position were significantly higher than those of patients who could not squat (Co: P = .033; Cr: P = .074) and kneel (Co: P = .049; Cr: P = .031). The metal ion levels of the COM THA group correlated with the total range of motion (Co: P = .0293; Cr: P = .0399). Conclusion: Patients who underwent a 36-mm COM THA showed high serum metal levels although good clinical outcomes at the midterm follow-up. We found that COM THA patients who were capable of greater range of motion, squatting, and kneeling are at risk of metal ion-related problems.",
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T1 - Increased Serum Ion Levels After Ceramic-on-Metal Bearing Total Hip Arthroplasty

T2 - Influence of an Asian Lifestyle

AU - Han, Seung Beom

AU - Oh, Jong-Keon

AU - Jang, Woo Young

AU - Choudhary, Nishant

AU - Kim, Hyun Gon

AU - Shon, Won Yong

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: Recent clinical studies have suggested that systemic metal ion levels are significantly elevated at midterm follow-up in patients with ceramic-on-metal (COM) bearing. However, it is not clear whether there is a correlation between patient-related factors including the lifestyle and elevated levels of serum metal ions following COM total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods: Serum metal levels were measured in 201 patients (234 hips) including 121 COM patients (140 hips) and 80 non-COM patients (94 hips). The Harris Hip Score, University of California, Los Angeles activity scale score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were measured and radiographs were obtained for the analysis. Results: Significantly higher levels of cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) were detected in the serum of the COM THA group (Co: 1.86 ± 4.0 μg/L; Cr: 1.81 ± 2.87 μg/L) than those of the non-COM THA group (Co: 0.27 ± 0.14 μg/L; Cr: 0.19 ± 0.25 μg/L; P < .001).The serum metal levels of patients who achieved the squatting position and the kneeling position were significantly higher than those of patients who could not squat (Co: P = .033; Cr: P = .074) and kneel (Co: P = .049; Cr: P = .031). The metal ion levels of the COM THA group correlated with the total range of motion (Co: P = .0293; Cr: P = .0399). Conclusion: Patients who underwent a 36-mm COM THA showed high serum metal levels although good clinical outcomes at the midterm follow-up. We found that COM THA patients who were capable of greater range of motion, squatting, and kneeling are at risk of metal ion-related problems.

AB - Background: Recent clinical studies have suggested that systemic metal ion levels are significantly elevated at midterm follow-up in patients with ceramic-on-metal (COM) bearing. However, it is not clear whether there is a correlation between patient-related factors including the lifestyle and elevated levels of serum metal ions following COM total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods: Serum metal levels were measured in 201 patients (234 hips) including 121 COM patients (140 hips) and 80 non-COM patients (94 hips). The Harris Hip Score, University of California, Los Angeles activity scale score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score were measured and radiographs were obtained for the analysis. Results: Significantly higher levels of cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) were detected in the serum of the COM THA group (Co: 1.86 ± 4.0 μg/L; Cr: 1.81 ± 2.87 μg/L) than those of the non-COM THA group (Co: 0.27 ± 0.14 μg/L; Cr: 0.19 ± 0.25 μg/L; P < .001).The serum metal levels of patients who achieved the squatting position and the kneeling position were significantly higher than those of patients who could not squat (Co: P = .033; Cr: P = .074) and kneel (Co: P = .049; Cr: P = .031). The metal ion levels of the COM THA group correlated with the total range of motion (Co: P = .0293; Cr: P = .0399). Conclusion: Patients who underwent a 36-mm COM THA showed high serum metal levels although good clinical outcomes at the midterm follow-up. We found that COM THA patients who were capable of greater range of motion, squatting, and kneeling are at risk of metal ion-related problems.

KW - Ceramic

KW - Level III

KW - Lifestyle

KW - Metal

KW - Prognostic study

KW - Serum ion

KW - Total hip arthroplasty

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