Inhibition of histone deacetylation alters Arabidopsis root growth in response to auxin via PIN1 degradation

Hoai Nguyen Nguyen, Jun Hyeok Kim, Chan Young Jeong, Suk Whan Hong, Hojoung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Key message: Our results showed the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) control root development in Arabidopsis via regulation of PIN1 degradation. Epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in the expression of many genes in response to exogenous or endogenous signals in plants as well as other organisms. One of epigenetic mechanisms is modifications of histone, such as acetylation and deacetylation, are catalyzed by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC), respectively. The Arabidopsis HDACs, HDA6, and HDA19, were reported to function in physiological processes, including embryo development, abiotic stress response, and flowering. In this study, we demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) inhibit primary root elongation and lateral root emergence. In response to HDIs treatment, the PIN1 protein was almost abolished in the root tip. However, the PIN1 gene did not show decreased expression in the presence of HDIs, whereas IAA genes exhibited increases in transcript levels. In contrast, we observed a stable level of gene expression of stress markers (KIN1 and COR15A) and a cell division marker (CYCB1). Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic regulation may control auxin-mediated root development through the 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of PIN1 protein.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1625-1636
Number of pages12
JournalPlant Cell Reports
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 1

Keywords

  • Auxin
  • Epigenetic
  • PIN1
  • Root development
  • Sodium butyrate (NaB)
  • Trichostatin A (TSA)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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