Interfamilial and intrafamilial genomic diversity and molecular phylogeny of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands

Vivek R. Nerurkar, Ki-Joon Song, Naruya Saitou, Rebecca R. Melland, Richard Yanagihara

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Abstract

To determine the interstrain genomic diversity and molecular phylogeny of the recently identified variants of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) in Melanesia, we enzymatically amplified, then directly sequenced representative regions of the gag, pol, and env genes of HTLV-I strains from 10 members of four families, including one family from Papua New Guinea and three families from the Solomon Islands. When aligned and compared to a Japanese strain of HTLV-I (ATK), the Melanesian HTLV-I strains differed by 7.6 to 8.7% in the gag, 7.1 to 9.3% in the pol, and 7.3 to 8.2% in the env gene regions. Based on 931 nucleotides, the overall sequence divergence of the 10 Melanesian HTLV-I strains from HTLV-I ATK was 7.3 to 8.1% (68 to 75 base substitutions). The intrafamilial genetic heterogeneity among these virus strains was nil to 0.2%, while the interfamilial sequence variation between HTLV-I strains from the Solomon Islands and those from Papua New Guinea was 3.4 to 4.2%, and the genetic heterogeneity among virus strains from the three Solomon Islands families was 0.2 to 0.9%. Using the maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining methods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HTLV-I strains from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands formed a monophyletic group and that the Melanesian and cosmopolitan strains of HTLV-I have evolved along two major geographically dependent lineages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)506-513
Number of pages8
JournalVirology
Volume196
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Melanesia
Papua New Guinea
Phylogeny
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
env Genes
Genetic Heterogeneity
pol Genes
gag Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Interfamilial and intrafamilial genomic diversity and molecular phylogeny of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. / Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Song, Ki-Joon; Saitou, Naruya; Melland, Rebecca R.; Yanagihara, Richard.

In: Virology, Vol. 196, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 506-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nerurkar, Vivek R. ; Song, Ki-Joon ; Saitou, Naruya ; Melland, Rebecca R. ; Yanagihara, Richard. / Interfamilial and intrafamilial genomic diversity and molecular phylogeny of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. In: Virology. 1993 ; Vol. 196, No. 2. pp. 506-513.
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