Internal carotid artery dorsal wall aneurysm with configurational change: are they all false aneurysms?

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Aneurysms arising from nonbranching sites of the ICA, so-called dorsal wall aneurysm, are rare entity, and present as blister type or saccular type. Occasionally configurational changes have been observed on serial cerebral angiography: a small blister-like bulge on ICA wall on initial angiography progressing to a saccular appearance within a few weeks. Such aneurysm showing configurational change has been regarded as a false aneurysm with fragile wall just like blister-type aneurysm, and direct surgical approach has been considered highly risky. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed small "blister-like" aneurysm at the medial wall of the ICA on initial angiography. After 12 days, the following angiograms demonstrated increased aneurysmal size and change of shape into a saccular configuration. Direct surgical approach was performed. The aneurysm had a relatively firm neck, and was successfully clipped without intraoperative rupture. The dome of aneurysm was resected after clipping and the histologic examination revealed it as a true aneurysm. Conclusions: This case suggests that all dorsal wall aneurysms with configurational change are not false aneurysms, and that angiographic findings do not always correlate with the nature of the aneurysmal wall; therefore, we should give more credence to direct surgical observation rather than preoperative angiographic findings when considering the most suitable surgical option.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-443
Number of pages3
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Oct 1

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False Aneurysm
Internal Carotid Artery
Aneurysm
Blister
Angiography
Cerebral Angiography
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Rupture
Neck
Observation

Keywords

  • Dorsal wall aneurysm
  • Histologic examination
  • Internal carotid artery
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • True aneurysm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Internal carotid artery dorsal wall aneurysm with configurational change: are they all false aneurysms?",
abstract = "Background: Aneurysms arising from nonbranching sites of the ICA, so-called dorsal wall aneurysm, are rare entity, and present as blister type or saccular type. Occasionally configurational changes have been observed on serial cerebral angiography: a small blister-like bulge on ICA wall on initial angiography progressing to a saccular appearance within a few weeks. Such aneurysm showing configurational change has been regarded as a false aneurysm with fragile wall just like blister-type aneurysm, and direct surgical approach has been considered highly risky. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed small {"}blister-like{"} aneurysm at the medial wall of the ICA on initial angiography. After 12 days, the following angiograms demonstrated increased aneurysmal size and change of shape into a saccular configuration. Direct surgical approach was performed. The aneurysm had a relatively firm neck, and was successfully clipped without intraoperative rupture. The dome of aneurysm was resected after clipping and the histologic examination revealed it as a true aneurysm. Conclusions: This case suggests that all dorsal wall aneurysms with configurational change are not false aneurysms, and that angiographic findings do not always correlate with the nature of the aneurysmal wall; therefore, we should give more credence to direct surgical observation rather than preoperative angiographic findings when considering the most suitable surgical option.",
keywords = "Dorsal wall aneurysm, Histologic examination, Internal carotid artery, Subarachnoid hemorrhage, True aneurysm",
author = "Kim, {Jong Hyun} and Taek-Hyun Kwon and Joo-Han Kim and Youn-Kwan Park and Chung, {Hung Seob}",
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T1 - Internal carotid artery dorsal wall aneurysm with configurational change

T2 - are they all false aneurysms?

AU - Kim, Jong Hyun

AU - Kwon, Taek-Hyun

AU - Kim, Joo-Han

AU - Park, Youn-Kwan

AU - Chung, Hung Seob

PY - 2006/10/1

Y1 - 2006/10/1

N2 - Background: Aneurysms arising from nonbranching sites of the ICA, so-called dorsal wall aneurysm, are rare entity, and present as blister type or saccular type. Occasionally configurational changes have been observed on serial cerebral angiography: a small blister-like bulge on ICA wall on initial angiography progressing to a saccular appearance within a few weeks. Such aneurysm showing configurational change has been regarded as a false aneurysm with fragile wall just like blister-type aneurysm, and direct surgical approach has been considered highly risky. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed small "blister-like" aneurysm at the medial wall of the ICA on initial angiography. After 12 days, the following angiograms demonstrated increased aneurysmal size and change of shape into a saccular configuration. Direct surgical approach was performed. The aneurysm had a relatively firm neck, and was successfully clipped without intraoperative rupture. The dome of aneurysm was resected after clipping and the histologic examination revealed it as a true aneurysm. Conclusions: This case suggests that all dorsal wall aneurysms with configurational change are not false aneurysms, and that angiographic findings do not always correlate with the nature of the aneurysmal wall; therefore, we should give more credence to direct surgical observation rather than preoperative angiographic findings when considering the most suitable surgical option.

AB - Background: Aneurysms arising from nonbranching sites of the ICA, so-called dorsal wall aneurysm, are rare entity, and present as blister type or saccular type. Occasionally configurational changes have been observed on serial cerebral angiography: a small blister-like bulge on ICA wall on initial angiography progressing to a saccular appearance within a few weeks. Such aneurysm showing configurational change has been regarded as a false aneurysm with fragile wall just like blister-type aneurysm, and direct surgical approach has been considered highly risky. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed small "blister-like" aneurysm at the medial wall of the ICA on initial angiography. After 12 days, the following angiograms demonstrated increased aneurysmal size and change of shape into a saccular configuration. Direct surgical approach was performed. The aneurysm had a relatively firm neck, and was successfully clipped without intraoperative rupture. The dome of aneurysm was resected after clipping and the histologic examination revealed it as a true aneurysm. Conclusions: This case suggests that all dorsal wall aneurysms with configurational change are not false aneurysms, and that angiographic findings do not always correlate with the nature of the aneurysmal wall; therefore, we should give more credence to direct surgical observation rather than preoperative angiographic findings when considering the most suitable surgical option.

KW - Dorsal wall aneurysm

KW - Histologic examination

KW - Internal carotid artery

KW - Subarachnoid hemorrhage

KW - True aneurysm

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